Cells in a microfluidic device

Our June issue

Equitable relationships in global health research, microfluidic cell culture, wireless soft robotics, ultrasound-assisted tissue engineering, subcutaneous delivery, diversifying engineering and more

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    Interested in meeting our editors in a virtual lab or site visit? Click the link above to find out more.

  • A plate with 3D-printed meat, tomatoes, rice, a glas of milk handed by a robot

    This collection brings together articles discussing the science and societal implications of engineered food, from genome-edited crops and computer-aided food engineering to cellular agriculture, nanotechnology-enabled plant agriculture and agricultural robotics.

  • Engineering visual

    Nature Reviews Bioengineering is launching a competition asking students and Postdocs around the globe to theoretically tackle some of the most pressing bioengineering challenges. Three challenges are awaiting innovative and creative solutions – from the idea to the sketch of a prototype – take part now!

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  • Global health-related research and development continues to uphold colonialist structures, concentrating knowledge generation and innovation to high-income countries, thereby hindering global health equity. Therefore, in addition to engineering new technologies, bioengineers will need to try to engineer equitable relationships.

    Editorial
  • Brain-on-a-chip models, mimicking brain physiology, hold promise for developing treatments for neurological disorders. This Review discusses the engineering challenges and opportunities for these devices, including the integration of 3D cell cultures and electrodes and scaffold engineering strategies.

    • Bram Servais
    • Negar Mahmoudi
    • David Collins
    Review Article
  • New insights into active versus passive nanoparticle tumour entry and exit mechanisms are enriching the understanding of tumour-targeted drug delivery. Here we align the principles of enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) and active transport and retention (ATR), and outline how their mechanistic features can be employed to improve the performance and clinical impact of cancer nanomedicines.

    • Anshuman Dasgupta
    • Alexandros Marios Sofias
    • Twan Lammers
    Comment
  • Postdoctoral researchers (postdocs), vital contributors to academia, often face vulnerability and uncertainty. Here is a wish list from a fellow postdoc, outlining key measures to improve postdoctoral life — from employment stability and fair compensation to better work-life balance and mentorship.

    • Siphesihle R. Nxele
    Comment
  • Stimulation therapy for neuropsychiatric disorders is hindered by the complexity and inter-individual and intra-individual variability in symptom manifestations, neural representations and response to therapy. Brain–computer interfaces could model the brain response to stimulation and decode the symptom state of a patient from brain activity as feedback to personalize the stimulation therapy in closed loop.

    • Lucine L. Oganesian
    • Maryam M. Shanechi
    Review Article
  • Despite inspiring proof-of-concepts that are often widely covered by the media, only a few neurotechnologies have firmly established themselves as clinical solutions. In this Review, we discuss opportunities and shortcomings of this technology, and provide a framework to facilitate clinical and commercial translation.

    • Gerwin Schalk
    • Peter Brunner
    • Kai J. Miller
    Review Article
  • An article in Nature Materials reports a new ultrasoft and conformal liquid bioelectronic material for injectable and retrievable biosensing.

    • Sadra Bakhshandeh
    Research Highlight
  • Organoid intelligence towards biocomputing may provide insights into the neuroscience of learning and memory, and offer a biohybrid form of information processing. Advances in brain region-specific organoid engineering, sensors and signal-processing tools, integration of artificial intelligence, and miniaturization will pave the way for organoid intelligence to make an impact in biomedicine and beyond.

    • Lena Smirnova
    Comment
  • Prosthetic embodiment, or the incorporation of a prosthesis into one’s sensory and functional body schema, may be achieved by engineering bionic limbs that leverage a closed-loop mechanoneural–machine interface. However, the subjective experience of embodiment remains difficult to define and assess.

    Editorial