Volume 2 Issue 6, June 2018

Volume 2 Issue 6

Moralization leads to protest violence

By analysing the language of tweets around protests in Baltimore in 2015 and through behavioural laboratory experiments, Mooijman and colleagues find that moralization of protest issues leads to greater support for violence and increased violent protests.

See Mooijman et al.

Image: Malte Mueller/Getty. Cover Design: Tulsi Voralia.

Comment & Opinion

  • Comment |

    The complex research, policy and industrial challenges of the twenty-first century require collaborative problem solving. Assessments suggest that, globally, many graduates lack necessary competencies. There is a pressing need, therefore, to improve and expand teaching of collaborative problem solving in our education systems.

    • Stephen M. Fiore
    • , Arthur Graesser
    •  & Samuel Greiff

News & Views

  • News & Views |

    Online communication has become integral to modern political behaviour — to the extent that events online both reflect and influence actions offline. A study uses geolocated Twitter data to argue that moralization of protests leads to violent protests and increased support for violence.

    • Zachary C. Steinert-Threlkeld

Research Highlights

Research

  • Letter |

    Aral and Dhillon specify a class of empirically motivated influence maximization models that incorporate more realistic features of real-world social networks and predict substantially greater influence propagation compared with traditional models.

    • Sinan Aral
    •  & Paramveer S. Dhillon
  • Letter |

    By analysing the language of tweets around protests in Baltimore in 2015 and through behavioural laboratory experiments, Dehghani and colleagues find that moralization of protest issues leads to greater support for violence and increased incidence of violent protest.

    • Marlon Mooijman
    • , Joe Hoover
    • , Ying Lin
    • , Heng Ji
    •  & Morteza Dehghani
  • Article |

    Lindström and Tobler find that ostracism of individuals can emerge incidentally, based on initial group structure, and is propagated by a simple reinforcement learning mechanism. The same mechanism can be used to reduce incidental ostracism.

    • Björn Lindström
    •  & Philippe N. Tobler
  • Article |

    Analytis et al. study social learning strategies for matters of taste and test their performance on a large-scale dataset. They show why a strategy’s success depends both on people’s level of experience and how their tastes relate to those of others.

    • Pantelis P. Analytis
    • , Daniel Barkoczi
    •  & Stefan M. Herzog

Amendments & Corrections