Editorials

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  • The freedom to research and publish without fear of state retribution is one that many academics take as a given. Unfortunately, this basic freedom is not universal.

    Editorial
  • Climate change is an immense challenge. Human behaviour is crucial in climate change mitigation, and in tackling the arising consequences. In this joint Focus issue between Nature Climate Change and Nature Human Behaviour, we take a closer look at the role of human behaviour in the climate crisis.

    Editorial
  • For years, researchers have interrogated scientists’ own research practices. A computational research stream, often termed ‘science of science’, studies the signatures these practices leave in big data. As the field matures, it is looking for ways to use its data-driven insights to make a tangible mark in science policy.

    Editorial
  • Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has wreaked death and destruction in the country, with impacts that reverberate worldwide. This Focus highlights the voices of Ukrainian scientists — at home and abroad — and provides insights into the many effects of the war.

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  • Bullying and harassment are systemic, pervasive problems in academia. We reflect on our role as editors and commit to taking steps that we hope will contribute to ongoing efforts to make academia safer for all.

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  • There are a lot of myths surrounding the peer review process. Here, we separate misconceptions from reality in the peer review process at Nature Human Behaviour.

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  • In ten contributions, mathematical modellers, public health officials, intellectual property experts and activists explain how vaccine inequities continue to fuel the pandemic, and how multilateral cooperation can help.

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  • On the occasion of our fifth anniversary, we look back and reflect on the journal’s first five years of life.

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  • Retractions are a key tool for maintaining the integrity of the published record. We need to recognize and reward researchers, especially early-career researchers, who do the right thing in coming forward with a request to retract research that cannot be relied upon due to honest error.

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  • The international day of LGBTQ+ people in STEM, 18 November, celebrates diversity in sexuality and gender identity, and raises awareness of persisting obstacles and challenges for LGBTQ+ scientists. It is important that the scientific community, journals and publishers included, creates the conditions that allow LGBTQ+ scientists to thrive — not only today, but every day.

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  • Description, prediction and explanation are all important in science. We welcome descriptive, predictive and explanatory studies, so long as the work is clear about its aims and uses appropriate methods to achieve its goals.

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  • Code is at the heart of computational social and behavioural science. To increase code reliability and reproducibility, we are implementing formal peer review of the code behind computational models whenever they are essential to the research we publish. We ask our authors to prepare and store their code with readability, transparency and future replicability in mind.

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  • Authors can appeal editorial decisions, and editors will always consider each appeal carefully. However, not all appeals are successful. Under what circumstances is appealing an editorial decision likely to reverse the outcome, and what are the features of a strong appeal?

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  • Titles are the first, and often the only, part of your paper that others will read. That’s why they matter so much, and here’s some practical advice on how to write them.

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  • Science is a cumulative enterprise, and systematic evidence synthesis is invaluable for appraising what is known and what is not known on a specific research question. We strongly encourage the submission of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Nature Human Behaviour.

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  • COVID-19 has forced a rethink of many practices we previously took for granted, and academic travel is no exception. Virtual conferences have demonstrated their promise for encouraging a more equitable and environmentally friendly future.

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  • Before accepting research manuscripts for publication, we ask authors to refrain from making priority or novelty claims and to remove qualitative evaluations of their own work. Both policies are intended to increase the accuracy and credibility of research we publish.

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