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Volume 5 Issue 5, May 2022

Van der Waals contacts on the wafer scale

High-quality van der Waals contacts between two-dimensional materials and three-dimensional metal electrodes can be formed on the wafer scale using a metal transfer printing technique in which electrodes are deposited on a graphene substrate, delaminated and then transferred onto two-dimensional semiconductors. The computer-generated image on the cover highlights the delamination of an array of metal electrodes from a graphene layer.

See Liu et al. and News & Views by Kwon

Image: Zengfeng Di, SIMIT CAS. Cover Design: Lauren Heslop.

Editorial

  • Methods to create van der Waals contacts between two-dimensional semiconductors and three-dimensional metals are helping to unleash the potential of two-dimensional devices.

    Editorial

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Research Highlights

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News & Views

  • Graphene can be used as a donor substrate to create van der Waals contacts between two-dimensional semiconductors and a variety of three-dimensional metal electrodes, including strongly adhering metals.

    • Soon-Yong Kwon
    News & Views
  • On-chip Floquet photonic topological insulators, which are based on switched-capacitor circulators, could be used to create hybrid electronic–photonic topological integrated circuits for emerging communication technologies.

    • Abhishek Kumar
    • Manoj Gupta
    • Ranjan Singh
    News & Views
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Research Briefings

  • Measurements reveal that the antiferromagnet ruthenium dioxide (RuO2) can generate an electric-field-induced spin current with a component of spin polarization perpendicular to the sample plane. This verifies theoretical predictions and provides a strategy for the future development of highly energy-efficient magnetic storage devices.

    Research Briefing
  • A silicon chip fabricated in a standard semiconductor foundry demonstrates that coupled ring oscillators can solve optimization problems targeted by quantum computers, and are quicker, cheaper and more energy-efficient than digital solvers. The 1,968 oscillator integrated circuit consumes 0.042 W and finds a solution within 50 oscillation cycles.

    Research Briefing
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