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Volume 1 Issue 7, July 2018

Chip-scale clocks rotate to a molecular beat

The sub-terahertz rotational transitions of polar gas molecules can be used as a frequency base to create chip-scale molecular clocks. The cover shows a photograph of the CMOS transmitter chip that is used, together with a receiver chip, to create the low-cost, low-power miniaturized clocks.

See Wang et al. and News & Views by Kitching

Image: Cheng Wang and Ruonan Han, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Cover Design: Karen Moore.

Editorial

  • Transient and ingestible electronic devices could play a valuable role in the development of personalized healthcare.

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Research Highlights

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News & Views

  • Spintronic devices capable of performing complementary logic operations can be created with the help of electric-field-controlled spin–orbit torque switching.

    • Kaiyou Wang
    News & Views
  • Single-crystalline layered perovskite nanowires, which have a high resistance in their interior but a high photoconductivity at their edges, can be used to create sensitive photodetectors.

    • F. Pelayo García de Arquer
    • Edward H. Sargent
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  • A memristor-based system can solve partial differential equations with better energy efficiency than methods based on conventional computers.

    • Cory Merkel
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  • Microwave transitions in the rotational spectrum of carbonyl sulfide molecules provide a timing reference that can be used to develop chip-scale atomic clocks.

    • John Kitching
    News & Views
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Reviews

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Research

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Reverse Engineering

  • Thin-film transistors made from indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) are driving the next evolution in active-matrix flat panel displays. Hideo Hosono recounts how demand for a high-performance alternative to amorphous silicon transistors led to their development.

    • Hideo Hosono
    Reverse Engineering
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