Volume 4 Issue 4, April 2020

Volume 4 Issue 4

City heat

Genetically distinct populations of urban lizards, such as male crested anoles (Anolis cristatellus) in Puerto Rico, provide an opportunity to understand rapid parallel evolution of complex thermal traits. A single non-synonymous polymorphism associated with heat tolerance plasticity may explain how these urban lizards can endure higher temperatures than populations in forests.

See Campbell-Staton et al.

Image: Kristin Winchell. Cover Design: Lauren Heslop.

Editorial

  • Editorial |

    Evidence synthesis facilitates a more robust understanding of generalities in ecology and evolution, as well as the effectiveness of conservation interventions. However, as synthesis methods become embedded in research workflows, it is imperative that the next generation of researchers receives sufficient training.

Correspondence

Comment & Opinion

  • Comment |

    There is an immediate need for a change in research workflows so that pre-existing knowledge is better used in designing new research. A formal assessment of the accumulated knowledge prior to research approval would reduce the waste of already limited resources caused by asking low priority questions.

    • Matthew J. Grainger
    • , Friederike C. Bolam
    • , Gavin B. Stewart
    •  & Erlend B. Nilsen
  • Comment |

    Synthesizing evidence is an essential part of scientific progress, but it is often done in a slow and uncoordinated manner, sometimes producing misleading conclusions. Here, we propose the idea of an ‘open synthesis community’ to resolve this pressing issue.

    • Shinichi Nakagawa
    • , Adam G. Dunn
    • , Malgorzata Lagisz
    • , Alexandra Bannach-Brown
    • , Eliza M. Grames
    • , Alfredo Sánchez-Tójar
    • , Rose E. O’Dea
    • , Daniel W. A. Noble
    • , Martin J. Westgate
    • , Pieter A. Arnold
    • , Stuart Barrow
    • , Alison Bethel
    • , Eve Cooper
    • , Yong Zhi Foo
    • , Sonya R. Geange
    • , Emily Hennessy
    • , Witness Mapanga
    • , Kerrie Mengersen
    • , Claudia Munera
    • , Matthew J. Page
    • , Vivian Welch
    • , Matthew Carter
    • , Owen Forbes
    • , Luis Furuya-Kanamori
    • , Charles T. Gray
    • , W. Kyle Hamilton
    • , Fonti Kar
    • , Emily Kothe
    • , Joey Kwong
    • , Luke A. McGuinness
    • , Paige Martin
    • , Mandlenkosi Ngwenya
    • , Christopher Penkin
    • , Daniel Perez
    • , Michael Schermann
    • , Alistair M. Senior
    • , Juan Vásquez
    • , Wolfgang Viechtbauer
    • , Thomas E. White
    • , Mitchell Whitelaw
    •  & Neal R. Haddaway

Reviews

  • Perspective |

    Anthropogenic sensory pollutants, such as noise, light and chemicals, are affecting biodiversity. This Perspective uses an understanding of animal sensory ecology to explore how these impacts can be mitigated.

    • Davide M. Dominoni
    • , Wouter Halfwerk
    • , Emily Baird
    • , Rachel T. Buxton
    • , Esteban Fernández-Juricic
    • , Kurt M. Fristrup
    • , Megan F. McKenna
    • , Daniel J. Mennitt
    • , Elizabeth K. Perkin
    • , Brett M. Seymoure
    • , David C. Stoner
    • , Jennifer B. Tennessen
    • , Cory A. Toth
    • , Luke P. Tyrrell
    • , Ashley Wilson
    • , Clinton D. Francis
    • , Neil H. Carter
    •  & Jesse R. Barber

Research

Amendments & Corrections

Search