Editorials

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    A revised format emphasizes our desire to encourage discussion of published papers.

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    The IPBES global assessment has brought biodiversity prominently to the attention of policymakers and the public, and researchers should seize this critical opportunity to engender change towards sustainability.

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    The editors of Nature Ecology & Evolution are always keen to hear about your research and answer your questions, and you can approach us at conferences or contact us via e-mail at any time.

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    The development of essential biodiversity variables offers the prospect of large-scale data synthesis and a smoother path from science to policy.

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    Despite on-going habitat loss caused by the advance of urbanisation, there are reasons to feel hopeful that cities can be spaces that benefit both biodiversity and human well-being — but it will require cross-sector engagement among ecologists, policymakers and the public.

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    One of the most visible impacts of current climate change is the catastrophic bleaching and death of corals in reefs around the world. This issue of Nature Ecology & Evolution and an online Focus highlight recent research documenting the transformation of these systems.

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    Our annual report of the journal’s statistics shows little overall change on gender and geographical diversity, and highlights areas where our editors want to redouble efforts — with help from you.

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    Keeping global temperature to no more than 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels is an enormous task that requires the complementary efforts of scientists from across the biological, physical and social sciences.

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    A major new report highlighting the importance of fungi to humans and natural ecosystems makes it clear that a coordinated global conservation strategy is urgently needed to ensure that their benefits may continue to be reaped.

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    In the 150 years since the discovery of human fossils at Cro-Magnon, archaeologists and palaeoanthropologists have grappled with the questions of how to recognize our species in the fossil record, and what we should call ourselves.

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    Recent threats to the Endangered Species Act in the USA and the battle to prevent logging in Poland’s Białowieża Forest highlight the need for robustness in environmental protection measures.

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    Children’s books about the natural world can help raise environmental awareness. The Nature Ecology & Evolution editors select some of their favourites, old and new.

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    Nature Ecology & Evolution’s broad scope brings together all strands of the story of biodiversity, and how our species fits in this ongoing narrative.

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    A new Nature journal checklist for authors is tailored specifically to ecology and evolution research, and is the product of feedback from the scientific community.

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    The conservation community is engaged in essential debate on realistic paths to effective and equitable protection of biodiversity. This must be matched with clear and workable messages to policymakers and the public.

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    Language is a fundamental human characteristic. Its origins and development can inform our understanding of human ecology and evolution, and evolutionary biology methods can be fruitfully applied to linguistics in turn.

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    The evolution of resistance has consequences for both food security and healthcare. To meet this challenge we need large-scale data to distinguish between what is evolutionarily plausible and what actually occurs in the field and the clinic.

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    Predators have important roles in structuring ecosystems, yet many are critically endangered and their reputation among non-scientists is decidedly mixed.

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    Nature Ecology & Evolution is a year old, and we are grateful for the enthusiastic reception from our research community. To celebrate our birthday we have compiled some facts and figures.

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    Science, including the fields of ecology and evolution, must advocate a zero-tolerance policy towards harassment and bullying. This means promoting safe workspaces in all contexts, and letting go of the idea that fieldwork entails special circumstances.

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    This month we highlight Asia, a region with important biodiversity and palaeontological heritage, and a major growth area for scientific research.

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    To defend evolution against misguided attacks, we need to consider how evolutionary biology is perceived by outsiders.

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    Ecological research projects that span decades provide unprecedented insight into the functioning and dynamics of populations, communities and ecosystems. We should treasure and protect them.

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    Evolutionary principles and tools harbour the potential to revolutionize the struggle against medical challenges such as antibiotic resistance, infectious disease and cancer.

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    The study of invasive species is burgeoning and involves both the natural and social sciences.

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    The emergence of new genes from non-coding DNA is common across eukaryotes — how they contribute to adaptive evolutionary novelties is fascinating.

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    The scientific community can engage productively with the public in a wide range of ways.

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    Exploring the challenges and opportunities for research and policy afforded by South America's extraordinary biodiversity.

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    Evolution is essential to understanding human biology, and the evolutionary impact of humans is an important factor in understanding the biology of other species.

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    Biologists have long been captivated by bats, whose unique adaptations are wonders of evolution. We examine some of the many reasons why they are so important to ecologists and evolutionary biologists.

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    Welcome to the inaugural issue of Nature Ecology & Evolution. Our mission is to bring you research and comment that explore the diversity of life in all its grandeur and to promote the importance of ecology and evolution in the wider world.