Editorials

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  • Although often not publicly identified, the personalities and life experiences of our referees affect their reviewing practices. Therefore having the most diverse set of reviewers possible underpins our efforts to ensure a fair peer review process.

    Editorial
  • As the world recovers from one global crisis, it must steel itself for the coming of a far greater one: the climate crisis. Astronomers and planetary scientists have roles to play as trusted scientific experts, but should seek partnerships with domain experts when venturing outside their areas of knowledge.

    Editorial
  • Many people have been unable to travel due to the pandemic, or even take a ‘staycation’. This August, we encourage you to slow down, look after your mental health, and let these stunning photographs transport you to a different place.

    Editorial
  • After years of relative neglect, Venus is enjoying renewed interest, with several missions bound to reach it in the next decade. Many questions about its nature still need to be answered, including regarding the highly debated presence of phosphine.

    Editorial
  • On the occasion of Pride month, we take the opportunity to revisit the discussion about equity in science and beyond and what we are doing to help.

    Editorial
  • Be it neutrinos, ultra-high-energy photons or gravitational waves, new cosmic messengers have expanded the available discovery space of astronomy by exploring previously inaccessible astrophysical environments.

    Editorial
  • The rapidly developing field of fast radio bursts (FRBs) took another leap forward in understanding when an FRB was associated with a magnetar in our Galaxy, identifying a specific source for the first time.

    Editorial
  • Three spacecraft from three different nations arrived at Mars in February 2021. Two of those nations are newcomers to Mars and the third successfully set out the path for a Mars sample return.

    Editorial
  • Nature Astronomy is committed to open science. The new open access option for authors is the next step along the road to full transparency, reproducibility and accessibility.

    Editorial
  • As we collectively welcome the new year, we retrace the 2020 milestones in sample return and look at a few of the major upcoming events in 2021. There are many reasons for astronomers to be optimistic.

    Editorial
  • The ‘new normal’ way of life for coping with the COVID-19 outbreak is a work in progress. When we move on, we should keep some of our adaptations rather than return to the old ways, for a more open and equitable way of working.

    Editorial
  • The detection of phosphine in the cloud decks of Venus generated 4,700 news stories around the world. This kind of coordination was only possible because of our embargo policy.

    Editorial
  • Quantitative estimates presented in this issue demonstrate that astronomers contribute more to climate change than the average global citizen. Concerted actions are needed to reduce the ecological impacts of our occupation.

    Editorial
  • Before its demise, the Dawn spacecraft performed a series of low passes over the bright spots of dwarf planet Ceres. These high-resolution data highlight the nature of Ceres as an active ocean world with unique characteristics.

    Editorial
  • The practice of peer review has only become commonplace fairly recently, and as such is continually undergoing revision. The latest progress has focused on reducing the load on those performing this community service and also reducing bias to ensure a fairer system for all.

    Editorial
  • On the anniversary of ROSAT’s launch, we reflect on the relevance and promise of X-ray observations in all fields of astronomy. Properly laying out a plan for the future of the field will allow it to continue flourishing.

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  • We are living in exceptional circumstances. It is not business as usual. There is no script, and where we end up after the global pandemic is partly up to us.

    Editorial
  • The Spitzer Space Telescope recently ceased operations, powering down its remaining detector after more than a decade and a half of revealing the infrared Universe. Its legacy will be continued by far more expensive missions that will have big boots to fill.

    Editorial
  • Staff across 74 UK universities are striking because pay and working conditions are eroding, and changes to the pension scheme mean that workers fear they are paying in more money for fewer benefits without good reason. More clarity is needed.

    Editorial