Aging well for Australia's First Nations

  • Kylie Radford
  • Gail Garvey
World View

Announcements

  • If you have a PhD, are passionate about the science of aging and age-related diseases, and have an unquenchable thirst to learn about new discoveries, apply to join our editorial team! Position open in New York, London, and Berlin. Applications accepted until August 19th

Nature Aging is a Transformative Journal; authors can publish using the traditional publishing route OR via immediate gold Open Access.

Our Open Access option complies with funder and institutional requirements.

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  • Indigenous Australians, one of the oldest living civilizations in the world, are growing older despite centuries of health and social inequity. Further improvements in longevity and aging will require a life-course approach and community-led initiatives.

    • Kylie Radford
    • Gail Garvey
    World View
  • The recent approval of a new drug for Alzheimer’s disease despite weak evidence of efficacy sent shockwaves throughout the scientific community. The approval leaves many open questions in its trail that must now be addressed.

    Editorial
  • Vaccine hesitancy has created a gap in COVID-19 vaccination status between residents and staff in long-term care settings. Closing that gap is essential to protect our most vulnerable populations and fulfill the duty of care they deserve.

    Editorial
  • The editors speak to Louise Aronson, geriatrician and Pulitzer Prize finalist, about how old age is perceived and defined, and the influence of social determinants on health. Aronson reflects on her experiences caring and advocating for older adults, and outlines some of the challenges to be addressed during the UN Decade of Healthy Aging.

    • Briony Jain
    Q&A
  • The pandemic has highlighted the need for stronger intergenerational connections. Restarting intergenerational programs and expanding newer initiatives to connect people of different ages must be prioritized in debates about how society should progress post-pandemic.

    Editorial
  • There is a major and rapidly growing deficiency in the US eldercare workforce at all levels, especially among physicians. Efforts to increase recruitment and retention into geriatrics have failed, especially among critically important educators and researchers. Possible strategies to assure adequate care for older persons are discussed.

    • John W. Rowe
    Comment

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