About the Editors

Editor

Elaine A Cohen Hubal, Raleigh, NC

Deputy Editor

Richard Peltier, Amherst, MA

Rick Peltier is an environmental health scientist with training in atmospheric chemistry, air quality instrument design and development, and he has expertise in air pollution exposure assessment.  His doctoral studies were completed in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institution of Technology in 2007.  For the past 10 years, his research has taken a specific focus on assessment of air pollution exposure in the underserved parts of the world, including directing research projects in Nepal, India, Kyrgyzstan, Ghana, and in indigenous communities across North America.  This research uses both traditional research instrumentation and low‐cost approaches, and collection of human biological samples to identify components of air quality responsible for health effects.  A recent focus in his research group is in science communication and outreach, and this has led to a rapidly increasing number of layperson publications on air quality.  He was a Rosenblith New Investigator Awardee from the Health Effects Institute, is the deputy editor in chief of the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, and co‐edited a statement paper on the use of low cost air quality sensors for the World Meteorological Organization.   Current funding sources include the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies. 

Areas of Expertise:  Air quality, Environmental health policy, Dose modeling/biomarkers/biomonitoring.

Associate Editor

Joseph G. Allen, Boston, MA

Areas of Expertise: Air quality, Chemical exposures and toxicology (e.g. EDCs, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, or food‐borne contaminants), radon, e‐cigs, flame retardants, ventilation, CO2, airplanes, noise, industrial hygiene. 

 

 

 

Associate Editor

Paloma Beamer, Tucson, AZ

Paloma I. Beamer, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the College of Public Health at the University of Arizona. She holds joint appointments as an associate professor of Chemical & Environmental Engineering and as a research scientist in the Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center.  She is an environmental engineer by training and earned her BS from the University of California Berkeley and her MS and PhD from Stanford University. Her research focuses on understanding how individuals are exposed to environmental contaminants and the health risks of these exposures with a special focus on vulnerable populations, including children, low‐wage immigrant workers, Native Americans and those in the US‐Mexico Border Region. The ultimate goal of her work is to develop more effective interventions and policies for prevention of avoidable cases of certain diseases such as asthma. 

Areas of Expertise: Air quality, Water, sanitation, hygeine, Chemical exposures and toxicology (e.g. EDCs, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, or food‐borne contaminants), Environmental epidemiology, Metals exposure, Dose modeling/biomarkers/biomonitoring. 

Associate Editor

Weihsueh Chiu, College Station, TX

Weihsueh A. Chiu, Ph.D. is a professor in the Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Texas A&M University. Before joining the university, he worked at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for more than 14 years, most recently as chief of the Toxicity Pathways Branch in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Division of the National Center for Environmental Assessment. Throughout his career, he has been involved in a diverse span of risk‐related topics, such as defense against chemical‐biological warfare agents, radioactive contamination in biosolids, human health risks from environmental chemical exposures, and the interface between science and policy.  His recent research has focused on human health risk assessment, particularly with respect to toxicokinetics, mechanisms of toxicity, physiologically‐based pharmacokinetic modeling, dose‐response assessment, characterizing uncertainty and variability, systematic review, and meta‐analysis.  He has a particular interest in the development and use of Bayesian and probabilistic methods.  Dr. Chiu has served on a variety of expert advisory committees for U.S. federal, state, and Canadian government agencies; the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; the World Health Organization; and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.  Dr. Chiu received an AB in Physics from Harvard University, a MA and PhD in Physics from Princeton University, and a Certificate in Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. 

Areas of Expertise: Air quality, Chemical exposures and toxicology (e.g. EDCs, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, or food‐borne contaminants), Spatial and computational methods, Environmental epidemiology, Environmental health policy, Dose modeling/biomarkers/biomonitoring. 

Associate Editor

Nicole Deziel, New Haven, CT

Dr. Deziel is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and the Yale School of Public Health. She has a Master’s of Industrial Hygiene and Doctorate in Environmental Health from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research involves applying statistical models, biomonitoring techniques, and environmental measurements to provide comprehensive and quantitative assessments of exposure to combinations of traditional and emerging environmental contaminants. Her exposure assessment strategies aim to reduce exposure misclassification for epidemiologic studies, advancing understanding of relationships between of exposure to environmental chemicals and risk of cancer and other adverse health outcomes. Dr. Deziel serves as the Principal Investigator of a study funded by the American Cancer Society investigating co‐exposures to multiple flame retardants, pesticides, and other persistent pollutants and thyroid cancer risk. She is also leading an inter‐disciplinary team of investigators on a project entitled “Drinking water vulnerability and neonatal health outcomes in relation to oil and gas production in the Appalachian Basin.” 

Areas of Expertise: Water, sanitation, hygeine, Chemical exposures and toxicology (e.g. EDCs, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, or food‐borne contaminants), Spatial and computational methods, Environmental epidemiology.

Associate Editor

Peter Fantke, Lyngby, Denmark

Associate Editor

Natalie von Götz, Zurich, Switzerland

Natalie von Goetz is scientific officer for exposure at the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health. Before, she worked at the Technical University ETH Zurich, where for 10 years she led a research group for modelling consumer exposure to chemicals of concern, with focus on the development of methodology for aggregate exposure modelling. She is member of several international and national working groups, such as e.g. the SCCS‐WG on ‘Nanomaterials in Cosmetic Products’ or the EFSA‐WG on ‘uncertainty in risk assessment’. 

Areas of Expertise: Chemical exposures and toxicology (e.g. EDCs, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, or food‐borne contaminants), Spatial and computational methods, Dose modeling/biomarkers/biomonitoring. 

Associate Editor

Sungkyoon Kim, Seoul, South Korea

Areas of Expertise: Chemical exposures and toxicology (e.g. EDCs, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, or food‐borne contaminants), Environmental epidemiology, Dose modeling/biomarkers/biomonitoring. 

Associate Editor

John C. Little, Blacksburg, VA

John Little received a BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Cape Town and an MS and PhD in Environmental Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.  After completing a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, he joined the faculty of the Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia, and currently holds the position of Charles E. Via, Jr. Professor.  His primary research interests are cross‐media mass transfer and process dynamics in environmental systems, with a focus on managing water quality in lakes, reservoirs, and watersheds and characterizing exposure to chemicals in air and water.  More recently, he has focused on a systems approach to sustainability, resilience, and integrated assessment.  Dr. Little received a National Science Foundation (NSF) Career Award in 1996, was elected to the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate (ISIAQ) Academy of Fellows in 2008, received the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors (AEESP)/CH2M Hill Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award in 2011, and the North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Technical Merit Research Award in 2014.  He served as Chair of the ISIAQ Scientific and Technical Committee: Sources, Monitoring and Evaluation: Chemicals as well as Chair of the International Water Association (IWA) Specialist Group on Lake and Reservoir Management.  He also served as Director of a $3M NSF Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) Program called EIGER – Exploring Interfaces through Graduate Education and Research.  Dr. Little has been a visiting professor in the School of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney, Australia, the Department of Surface Waters, Swiss Federal Institute for Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag), Switzerland, the Department of Building Science, Tsinghua University, China, the Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, and the Instituto del Agua, University of Granada, Spain. 

Areas of Expertise: Chemical exposures and toxicology (e.g. EDCs, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, or food‐borne contaminants). 

Associate Editor

Shoji F. Nakayama, Tsukuba, Japan

Head of Exposure Dynamics Research Section, Centre for Health and Environmental Risk Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan Dr Shoji Nakayama is an MD and holds PhD in public health. His expertise is in exposure science, especially of children’s exposure. He is certified as a Public Health Specialist/Supervisor by Japan Board of Public Health and Social Medicine. He is an associate editor of the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology. In 2005, Dr Nakayama was invited to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and worked on exposure research on perfluorinated alkyl compounds. In 2009, he moved to EPA’s engineering laboratory to help risk management of the emerging contaminants. Then in 2011, Dr Nakayama joined the National Institute for Environmental Studies in Japan. He is a lead exposure scientist for the Japan Environment and Children’s Study (JECS), which is a longitudinal birth cohort study involving 100,000 mothers and children. Dr Nakayama collaborates with US, EU and Asian researchers to advance and promote children’s environmental health research. 

Areas of Expertise: Chemical exposures and toxicology (e.g. EDCs, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, or food‐borne contaminants), Environmental epidemiology, Metals exposure, Dose modeling/biomarkers/biomonitoring.

Associate Editor

Lesliam Quirós-Alcalá, College Park, MD

Areas of Expertise: Chemical exposures and toxicology (e.g. EDCs, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, or food‐borne contaminants), Environmental epidemiology, Dose modeling/biomarkers/biomonitoring, Children's Environmental Health.

 

 

Associate Editor

Stefanie Sarnat, Atlanta, GA

Dr. Stefanie Ebelt Sarnat is Associate Professor of Environmental Health at the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University. Her epidemiological research focuses on examining health effects of ambient air quality using population‐ and panel‐based approaches. She leads large‐scale time‐series studies of ambient air quality and acute morbidity, using emergency department visit data as an indicator of population health. Dr. Sarnat’s work on these studies focuses on assessment of ambient air pollution mixtures and metrics of extreme heat, examination of the impacts of exposure measurement error on observed epidemiological findings, and assessing exposure and population factors that may modify health risk. Her studies also include prospective panel‐based designs, using field investigation methods to further understand environmental exposure factors and health effects among susceptible and vulnerable populations. Dr. Sarnat holds a B.Sc. in Microbiology and Immunology and a M.Sc. in Occupational Hygiene from the University of British Columbia and a Sc.D. in Environmental Health from the Harvard School of Public Health. 

Areas of Expertise: Air quality, Environmental epidemiology, Exposure science related to air quality (air pollution and heat), Climate change as pertains to air quality and heat.

Associate Editor

Cathryn Tonne, Barcelona, Spain

Associate Editor

Ami Zota, Washington, DC

Ami Zota is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health at the George Washington University Milken School of Public Health. Dr. Zota’s work seeks to secure environmental justice and improve health equity through advancements in science, policy, and clinical practice. Her research identifies novel pathways linking social disparities, environmental exposures, and reproductive and children’s health. She received a career development award from the National Institutes of Health for her research on environmental health disparities and was recently recognized as a Pioneer Under 40 in Environmental Public Health by the Collaborative on Health and the Environment. She is currently an Associate Editor of Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology and on the Editorial Boards of Environmental Health Perspectives and Environmental Epigenetics. 

Dr. Zota is equally committed to developing innovative approaches for science translation so that her research can more effectively be used to inform individual and collective decision‐making. Her research has been featured in high‐impact national and international media publications including the Washington Post, LA Times, USA Today, Huffington Post, and the Atlantic Monthly. She has helped shape health and safety standards for consumer product chemicals by participating in legislative briefings, providing technical assistance to the NGO community, and communicating science through mainstream and social media outlets.  

She received her masters and doctorate in environmental health at the Harvard School of Public Health and then completed postdoctoral fellowships at Silent Spring Institute and UCSF Program on Reproductive Health. 

Areas of Expertise: Chemical exposures and toxicology (e.g. EDCs, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, or food‐borne contaminants), Environmental epidemiology, Metals exposure, Environmental health policy, Dose modeling/biomarkers/biomonitoring, Vulnerable populations, environmental health disparities. 

Social Media Editor

Pallavi Pant, Boston, MA

Pallavi Pant is a Scientist at the Health Effects Institute in Boston, USA.She holds a PhD in environmental health from the University of Birmingham, UK, and MSc in Environmental Studies from TERI School of Advanced Studies, India. Her research focuses on characterization and assessment of urban air pollution, particularly in South Asia. She is also active in initiatives to promote public understanding of air pollution in South Asia and elsewhere and is actively engaged in projects on public engagement on air quality and health as well as STEM outreach. 

Areas of Expertise: Air quality.

Former Editors

Edo Pellizzari
Dana Boyd Barr
Morton Lippmann