Collections

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    Communications Biology have published a series of interviews with early career researchers in which they talk about their research and experiences.

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    This Collection of articles from several Nature journals covers the latest advances in our understanding of cartilage as a tissue, as well as insights into cartilage repair and potential regeneration strategies.

    Image: Springer Nature Limited/YAY Media AS/Alamy
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    In this collection, we highlight commentary and reviews from across the Nature Research journals that address some of the questions and considerations surrounding access of human genomic data. We have also selected research articles from across our journals that demonstrate the power of large-scale genomic data and data access

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    This collection from the cancer editorial community at Nature Research journals focuses on highlighting work on rare cancers, from preclinical basic research to translational and clinical research.

    Image: Simon Bradbrook/Springer Nature Limited
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    Communications Biology published its first articles on January 22, 2018. In this collection, our in-house editors highlight some of their favorite papers from our first year of publishing. This collection also includes all Review and Comment articles published during our first year. To celebrate some of our featured articles, we have also commissioned 'After the Paper' Comment articles from a few of our authors. These will be added to the collection as they are published. Finally, we link to all 'Behind the Paper' posts published by our authors on some of the Nature Research community sites.

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    The UK Biobank is a prospective cohort study with deep genetic, physical and health data collected on ~500,000 individuals from 2006-2010 across the United Kingdom. This unprecedented open access genetic database has enabled large scale studies on genetic and epidemiological associations for a broad range of health related traits. The UK Biobank has made their datasets and research results accessible to researchers as an open access resource to benefit public health.

    Image: Kelly Krause, Nature