Nature Outlook |

Bladder cancer

Nature Outlook: Bladder cancer

For three decades, the treatment of bladder cancer stood still. There were no new drugs and no improvements in diagnosis or survival rates. But all of that has changed, and now people with the disease and researchers have more options and hope. This Outlook discusses topics such as: how checkpoint-inhibitor drugs are helping those affected to survive for longer; why a healthy bladder is not sterile; and how the genetics of bladder cancer is revealing some surprising connections.

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Content

The diagnostics, treatment and five-year survival rates for bladder cancer are largely unchanged since the 1990s. Research into cancer genomics, risk factors and immune therapies could hold the key to progress against this malignant disease.

Outlook | | Nature

People with metastatic bladder cancer once faced meagre treatment options and a grim prognosis. But immunotherapy has started to yield results.

Outlook | | Nature

Bladder cancer is more deadly in women than in men. That needs to change, say James McKiernan and Denise Asafu-Adjei.

Outlook | | Nature

Once thought to be sterile, the bladder contains microbes that could influence the development and treatment of cancer.

Outlook | | Nature

What happens when a professor of theatre finds out she has bladder cancer? She writes a one-woman play about it, of course.

Outlook | | Nature

Mechele Leon, an associate professor of theatre at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, was diagnosed with bladder cancer in March 2016. After treatment, Leon was left with no bladder, a urostomy bag, and a story to tell — which became a one-woman play called Bladder Interrupted.

Outlook | | Nature

Researchers delving into the details of bladder cancer are finding a rich trove of genetic information.

Outlook | | Nature

Tackling the challenges of genomics and studies of the immune system should help to create much-needed diagnostics and treatments.

Outlook | | Nature

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Review Article | | Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology

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