Special |

Ebola epidemic

Even if Ebola has faded from the headlines, the danger remains. As the largest and most deadly outbreak of Ebola winds down, scientists and public health officials are looking closely at what it will take to finish the job and to prepare better for the next big crisis. The apparent success of a nimble and creative clinical trial for a vaccine is a positive and instructive outcome. But many of the most important lessons come from failures in preparedness.

Here you can follow Nature’s full coverage of the crisis, including the travails of reporter Erika Check Hayden who travelled to Sierra Leone in December 2014, along with recent research and archival coverage of Ebola’s past.

Features and commentary

The success of an Ebola vaccine trial shows that clinical trials can be done under the difficult field conditions of an epidemic — if there is enough political and regulatory will.

Editorial | | Nature News

The world is ill-prepared for the next epidemic or pandemic. But the horror of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa may drive change.

News Feature | | Nature News

The World Health Organization announces the end of Ebola in Liberia, but the epidemic continues in nearby Sierra Leone and Guinea.

News | | Nature News

Scientists know a lot about the virus that causes Ebola — but there are many puzzles that they have yet to solve.

News Feature | | Nature News

Drawing on his experiences in previous outbreaks, David L. Heymann calls for rapid diagnosis, patient isolation, community engagement and clinical trials.

Comment | | Nature News

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa must be shut down now, or the disease will continue to spread.

Editorial | | Nature News

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has starkly exposed major gaps in plans to tackle emerging infectious diseases. Lessons must be learned.

Editorial | | Nature News

News

The World Health Organization announces the end of Ebola in Liberia, but the epidemic continues in nearby Sierra Leone and Guinea.

News | | Nature News

Further news

Research papers

The genome sequences of 175 Ebola virus from five districts in Sierra Leone, collected during September–November 2014, show that the rate of virus evolution seems to be similar to that observed during previous outbreaks and that the genetic diversity of the virus has increased substantially, with the emergence of several novel lineages.

Letter | open | | Nature

An analysis of 85 Ebola virus sequences collected in Guinea from July to November 2014 provides insight into the evolution of the Ebola virus responsible for the epidemic in West Africa; the results show sustained transmission of three co-circulating lineages, each defined by multiple mutations.

Letter | open | | Nature

A new treatment, containing an optimized cocktail of three monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus, provided full protection and disease reversal in rhesus monkeys when given under conditions in which controls succumbed by day 8; this new therapy may be a good candidate for treating Ebola virus infection in human patients.

Article | | Nature

The search for therapeutics to treat infections by ebolaviruses and Marburg virus has focused on identifying compounds that interfere with viral entry into host cells. Here, White and Schornberg discuss recent studies that have identified Niemann–Pick C1 (NPC1), a protein that resides deep in the endocytic pathway, as an important host factor in this process.

Progress | | Nature Reviews Microbiology