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COVID-19 and rheumatology

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic presents numerous challenges to patients with rheumatological diseases, their health care providers and researchers attempting to determine the course and consequences of SARS-CoV-2 infection. To highlight emerging research related to the pandemic, the editors of Nature Reviews Rheumatology have curated a collection of relevant articles published in the journal, including Reviews, Opinion and News pieces touching on basic, translational and clinical aspects of COVID-19 in rheumatology, as well as the impact of the pandemic on rheumatology practice and patient care.

You can also read the latest news and opinion from Nature on SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 here, and articles from across the Nature Research journals here.

Reviews and Perspectives

This Perspective article explores similarities in the inflammatory processes underlying coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and rheumatoid arthritis, including the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the potential of anti-cytokine therapies to treat COVID-19, as well as the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on rheumatology.

Perspective | | Nature Reviews Rheumatology

In this Perspective article, the authors recount the earliest stages of translational research into IL-6 biology and the subsequent development of therapeutic IL-6 pathway inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune rheumatic diseases and potentially numerous other indications.

Perspective | | Nature Reviews Rheumatology

News and Opinion

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a rare complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection that can result in serious illness in the paediatric population but our understanding of this syndrome is in its infancy. Translational studies in 2020 leveraging immune profiling have laid the foundation to enable further discovery in MIS-C.

Year in Review | | Nature Reviews Rheumatology

Since the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, numerous risk factors for severe disease have been identified. Whether patients with rheumatic diseases, especially those receiving DMARDs, are at an increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection or severe COVID-19 disease remains unclear, although epidemiological studies are providing some insight.

Year in Review | | Nature Reviews Rheumatology

The COVID-19 pandemic led to unprecedented changes in rheumatology clinical practice. In this Viewpoint article, we asked five experts to describe their experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic, how their clinical practice has changed, and the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead.

Viewpoint | | Nature Reviews Rheumatology

The COVID-19 pandemic has compelled the global community to work together to understand SARS-CoV-2 and mitigate its effects, but it has also highlighted health disparities faced by people from minority racial or ethnic groups and other marginalized populations. International collaboration needs to be leveraged to address these disparities and inequities.

Comment | | Nature Reviews Rheumatology

The COVID-19 pandemic has catalysed the sudden adoption of telemedicine in the management of rheumatic diseases. In this abrupt transition from in-person visits to telemedicine, can patient-reported outcomes (PROs) help ensure that we continue to achieve optimum disease control and address the concerns of people living with rheumatoid arthritis?

News & Views | | Nature Reviews Rheumatology

Emerging reports show that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection precedes the appearance of various autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases, including paediatric inflammatory multisystemic syndrome (PIMS) or multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), thus adding to the growing mystery of this virus and raising questions about the nature of its link with autoimmune and autoinflammatory sequelae.

News & Views | | Nature Reviews Rheumatology

Physical inactivity is common during periods of self-isolation, but for patients with rheumatic diseases, there are crucial benefits to be gained from maintaining an active lifestyle throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Patients should be provided with support to maintain physical activity and avoid prolonged periods of time spent sitting.

Comment | | Nature Reviews Rheumatology