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Diversity: A Nature & Scientific American Special Issue

Greater diversity in science's workforce and ideas is long overdue. Nature, in this special issue with Scientific American, explores connections between diversity and the rigour of research — including how marginalization affects study design — and discusses persistent, misguided assumptions. The message is clear: inclusive science is better science.

Content

There is growing evidence that embracing diversity — in all its senses — is key to doing good science. But there is still work to be done to ensure that inclusivity is the default, not the exception.

Editorial | | Nature

Effective clinical studies must consider all ethnicities — exclusion can endanger populations, says Esteban G. Burchard.

Comment | | Nature

The sciences can be a sanctuary for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender individuals, but biases may still discourage many from coming out.

News Feature | | Nature

From the archive

Universities seek to recreate the success of one institution's mentorship programme for minorities in science.

Feature | | Nature

A standard test for admission to graduate school misses potential winners, say Casey Miller and Keivan Stassun.

Column | | Nature

Social prejudices and stereotyping are pervasive and often operate unconsciously. In this Review, David M. Amodio considers the neural basis of prejudice and stereotyping and discusses the processes through which such biases may form, can influence behaviour and are regulated.

Review Article | | Nature Reviews Neuroscience

Chemistry needs new female role models and a less macho culture to appeal more to the next generation of young women, says Carol V. Robinson.

Comment | | Nature

The editors of this publication need to improve how we reflect women’s contributions to science. For this, we must inject an extra loop into our thinking.

Editorial | | Nature

Harvard University president Larry Summers was heavily criticized last year when he claimed that differences in innate aptitude, rather than discrimination, were behind the failure of women to advance in scientific careers. Some other academics agreed with Summers' analysis: “rubbish”, to paraphrase the views of female-to-male transgendered scientist Ben A. Barres.

Commentary | | Nature

Welcoming lab environments and networking organizations help lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender scientists to excel.

Feature | | Nature

Joan — formerly Jonathan — Roughgarden rejects established evolutionary ideas about gender roles and sexuality. Everyone wants to discuss the parallels with her personal experience. But the science speaks for itself, she tells Virginia Gewin.

News Feature | | Nature

Medical genomics has focused almost entirely on those of European descent. Other ethnic groups must be studied to ensure that more people benefit, say Carlos D. Bustamante, Esteban González Burchard and Francisco M. De La Vega.

Comment | | Nature