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Nature Plants – Celebrating our 3rd Anniversary

 
It doesn’t feel like three years since the first papers were published in Nature Plants in January 2015. However, as Nature Plants embarks on its 4th volume this seems like a good time to look back on the research we have published in the last three years. It is always difficult choosing the ‘highlights’ from such a wide-ranging collection of research. For this anniversary collection we have looked to see which have been the highest performers by a few measures: 

  • The most read papers as judged by the number of times that they have been downloaded from our site.
  • The most cited papers from each of our first three years.
  • The most discussed papers as judged by the Altmetric scores that they have accrued.

Interestingly the top papers by each measure are not the same! 

 

 

Most read

  • Nature Plants | Article

    The desert moss Syntrichia caninervis maximizes water collection in dry environments by collecting water droplets from fog using the tiny hairs on the end of its leaves and passing them down through the plant, rather than taking water up through the roots.

    • Zhao Pan
    • , William G. Pitt
    • , Yuanming Zhang
    • , Nan Wu
    • , Ye Tao
    •  &  Tadd T. Truscott
  • Nature Plants | Article

    Maize originated in southern Mexico from domestication of the wild grass teosinte, and diffused throughout the Americas. Sequenced DNA from archaeological samples spanning 6,000 years, documents the diffusion route and reveals the genes that were specifically selected for climatic and cultural adaptation to the US Southwest.

    • Rute R. da Fonseca
    • , Bruce D. Smith
    • , Nathan Wales
    • , Enrico Cappellini
    • , Pontus Skoglund
    • , Matteo Fumagalli
    • , José Alfredo Samaniego
    • , Christian Carøe
    • , María C. Ávila-Arcos
    • , David E. Hufnagel
    • , Thorfinn Sand Korneliussen
    • , Filipe Garrett Vieira
    • , Mattias Jakobsson
    • , Bernardo Arriaza
    • , Eske Willerslev
    • , Rasmus Nielsen
    • , Matthew B. Hufford
    • , Anders Albrechtsen
    • , Jeffrey Ross-Ibarra
    •  &  M. Thomas P. Gilbert
  • Nature Plants | Article | open

    Two high-quality genomes of petunia wild parents reveal two rounds of hexaploidization in the evolution of Petunia lineage and provide insights into the diversity of floral patterns and pollination systems — enhancing the model value of this genus.

    • Aureliano Bombarely
    • , Michel Moser
    • , Avichai Amrad
    • , Manzhu Bao
    • , Laure Bapaume
    • , Cornelius S. Barry
    • , Mattijs Bliek
    • , Maaike R. Boersma
    • , Lorenzo Borghi
    • , Rémy Bruggmann
    • , Marcel Bucher
    • , Nunzio D'Agostino
    • , Kevin Davies
    • , Uwe Druege
    • , Natalia Dudareva
    • , Marcos Egea-Cortines
    • , Massimo Delledonne
    • , Noe Fernandez-Pozo
    • , Philipp Franken
    • , Laurie Grandont
    • , J. S. Heslop-Harrison
    • , Jennifer Hintzsche
    • , Mitrick Johns
    • , Ronald Koes
    • , Xiaodan Lv
    • , Eric Lyons
    • , Diwa Malla
    • , Enrico Martinoia
    • , Neil S. Mattson
    • , Patrice Morel
    • , Lukas A. Mueller
    • , Joëlle Muhlemann
    • , Eva Nouri
    • , Valentina Passeri
    • , Mario Pezzotti
    • , Qinzhou Qi
    • , Didier Reinhardt
    • , Melanie Rich
    • , Katja R. Richert-Pöggeler
    • , Tim P. Robbins
    • , Michael C. Schatz
    • , M. Eric Schranz
    • , Robert C. Schuurink
    • , Trude Schwarzacher
    • , Kees Spelt
    • , Haibao Tang
    • , Susan L. Urbanus
    • , Michiel Vandenbussche
    • , Kitty Vijverberg
    • , Gonzalo H. Villarino
    • , Ryan M. Warner
    • , Julia Weiss
    • , Zhen Yue
    • , Jan Zethof
    • , Francesca Quattrocchio
    • , Thomas L. Sims
    •  &  Cris Kuhlemeier
  • Nature Plants | Letter

    Many plants exhibit iridescence but no link has been demonstrated between this phenomenon and photosynthesis. This study shows the epidermal chloroplasts of Begonia to have photonic properties that increase both light capture and quantum yield.

    • Matthew Jacobs
    • , Martin Lopez-Garcia
    • , O.-Phart Phrathep
    • , Tracy Lawson
    • , Ruth Oulton
    •  &  Heather M. Whitney
  • Nature Plants | Letter

    Fully enclosed, controlled-environment growth chambers can accelerate plant development. Such ‘speed breeding’ reduces generation times to accelerate crop breeding and research programmes, and can integrate with other modern crop breeding technologies.

    • Amy Watson
    • , Sreya Ghosh
    • , Matthew J. Williams
    • , William S. Cuddy
    • , James Simmonds
    • , María-Dolores Rey
    • , M. Asyraf Md Hatta
    • , Alison Hinchliffe
    • , Andrew Steed
    • , Daniel Reynolds
    • , Nikolai M. Adamski
    • , Andy Breakspear
    • , Andrey Korolev
    • , Tracey Rayner
    • , Laura E. Dixon
    • , Adnan Riaz
    • , William Martin
    • , Merrill Ryan
    • , David Edwards
    • , Jacqueline Batley
    • , Harsh Raman
    • , Jeremy Carter
    • , Christian Rogers
    • , Claire Domoney
    • , Graham Moore
    • , Wendy Harwood
    • , Paul Nicholson
    • , Mark J. Dieters
    • , Ian H. DeLacy
    • , Ji Zhou
    • , Cristobal Uauy
    • , Scott A. Boden
    • , Robert F. Park
    • , Brande B. H. Wulff
    •  &  Lee T. Hickey
  • Nature Plants | Article

    There's a lack of knowledge on the extent to which mRNAs are transported across tissues in plants. Now a study combining RNA-seq with grafting experiments identifies 2,006 genes in Arabidopsis thaliana that generate mobile mRNAs.

    • Christoph J. Thieme
    • , Monica Rojas-Triana
    • , Ewelina Stecyk
    • , Christian Schudoma
    • , Wenna Zhang
    • , Lei Yang
    • , Miguel Miñambres
    • , Dirk Walther
    • , Waltraud X. Schulze
    • , Javier Paz-Ares
    • , Wolf-Rüdiger Scheible
    •  &  Friedrich Kragler

Most cited

  • Nature Plants | Article

    The frequency of severe droughts is increasing in many regions around the world as a result of climate change. An analysis of tree growth and mortality data from forests worldwide suggests that large trees fare worse under drought than small trees.

    • Amy C. Bennett
    • , Nathan G. McDowell
    • , Craig D. Allen
    •  &  Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira
  • Nature Plants | Brief Communication

    Transient assays and transgenic experiments demonstrate that sgRNA/Cas9 constructs targeting the bean yellow dwarf virus inhibit the accumulation of the virus and confer resistance in transgenic N. benthamiana plants.

    • Nicholas J. Baltes
    • , Aaron W. Hummel
    • , Eva Konecna
    • , Radim Cegan
    • , Aaron N. Bruns
    • , David M. Bisaro
    •  &  Daniel F. Voytas
  • Nature Plants | Article

    The genetic diversity of wild relatives of domesticated crops can be useful for developing more productive, nutritious and resilient crop varieties. A comparison of the modelled diversity of crop wild relatives with their representation in gene banks suggests that a systematic effort is needed to improve their conservation and availability for use in plant breeding.

    • Nora P. Castañeda-Álvarez
    • , Colin K. Khoury
    • , Harold A. Achicanoy
    • , Vivian Bernau
    • , Hannes Dempewolf
    • , Ruth J. Eastwood
    • , Luigi Guarino
    • , Ruth H. Harker
    • , Andy Jarvis
    • , Nigel Maxted
    • , Jonas V. Müller
    • , Julian Ramirez-Villegas
    • , Chrystian C. Sosa
    • , Paul C. Struik
    • , Holly Vincent
    •  &  Jane Toll
  • Nature Plants | Article | open

    A high-quality rubber tree genome reveals insights into the evolution of rubber biosynthesis and ethylene stimulation in rubber production. Together with transcriptome data, this study provides valuable data for the research and breeding of rubber trees.

    • Chaorong Tang
    • , Meng Yang
    • , Yongjun Fang
    • , Yingfeng Luo
    • , Shenghan Gao
    • , Xiaohu Xiao
    • , Zewei An
    • , Binhui Zhou
    • , Bing Zhang
    • , Xinyu Tan
    • , Hoong-Yeet Yeang
    • , Yunxia Qin
    • , Jianghua Yang
    • , Qiang Lin
    • , Hailiang Mei
    • , Pascal Montoro
    • , Xiangyu Long
    • , Jiyan Qi
    • , Yuwei Hua
    • , Zilong He
    • , Min Sun
    • , Wenjie Li
    • , Xia Zeng
    • , Han Cheng
    • , Ying Liu
    • , Jin Yang
    • , Weimin Tian
    • , Nansheng Zhuang
    • , Rizhong Zeng
    • , Dejun Li
    • , Peng He
    • , Zhe Li
    • , Zhi Zou
    • , Shuangli Li
    • , Chenji Li
    • , Jixiang Wang
    • , Dong Wei
    • , Chao-Qiang Lai
    • , Wei Luo
    • , Jun Yu
    • , Songnian Hu
    •  &  Huasun Huang

Most discussed

  • Nature Plants | Brief Communication

    Mutualisms are common in nature. In Fiji, a species of ant selects, disperses and fertilizes an epiphytic plant in an exclusive symbiosis. This represents a novel example of plant farming by ants.

    • Guillaume Chomicki
    •  &  Susanne S. Renner
  • Nature Plants | Letter

    Fossil plants preserved in amber can give detailed palaeoevolutionary and biogeographical insights; the same degree of preservation can be found for vascular plant remains as for arthropods. This paper presents the earliest member of the highly diverse and widespread asterid clade of angiosperms preserved in mid-Tertiary Dominican amber, Strychnos electri sp. nov.

    • George O. Poinar Jr
    •  &  Lena Struwe
  • Nature Plants | Letter

    Food production causes a third of global greenhouse gas emissions. This life-cycle assessment of the supply chain of a loaf of bread finds that over half of its environmental impacts arise from wheat cultivation, with 40% from the use of nitrate fertiliser.

    • Liam Goucher
    • , Richard Bruce
    • , Duncan D. Cameron
    • , S. C. Lenny Koh
    •  &  Peter Horton
  • Nature Plants | Article

    Modelling and remote sensing predict that near-future climate change could make 41–61% of the growing area of coffee in Ethiopia unusable. However, relocation of coffee areas and forest conservation could see coffee farming areas increase fourfold.

    • Justin Moat
    • , Jenny Williams
    • , Susana Baena
    • , Timothy Wilkinson
    • , Tadesse W. Gole
    • , Zeleke K. Challa
    • , Sebsebe Demissew
    •  &  Aaron P. Davis
  • Nature Plants | Letter

    Pottery remains from archaeological sites in the Libyan Sahara provide the earliest direct evidence for plant processing in pottery, dating to 8200–6400 cal BC. The remains show processing of grasses and aquatic plants gathered from the then green Sahara.

    • Julie Dunne
    • , Anna Maria Mercuri
    • , Richard P. Evershed
    • , Silvia Bruni
    •  &  Savino di Lernia