Collection |

150 years of Nature

The first issue of Nature was published in November 1869. That makes 2019 our 150th anniversary year. The history of Nature mirrors how science and its role in society have changed over that time. Here, we are collecting articles that reflect the past, present and future of Nature, as well as that of the global research community we serve. 

How did data get so big? Through political, social and economic interests, shows Sabina Leonelli, in the fourth essay on how the past 150 years have shaped the science system, marking Nature’s anniversary.

Comment | | Nature

Nearly 30 years ago, a simple chemical principle was reported that enabled the synthesis of a plethora of porous materials — some of which might enable applications ranging from biomedicine to petrochemical processing.

News & Views | | Nature

The discovery that cell differentiation can be reversed challenged theories of how cell identity is determined, laying the foundations for modern methods of reprogramming cell identity and promising new regenerative therapies.

News & Views | | Nature

In the early 1950s, the identity of genetic material was still a matter of debate. The discovery of the helical structure of double-stranded DNA settled the matter — and changed biology forever.

News & Views | | Nature

Biological advances have repeatedly changed who we think we are, writes Nathaniel Comfort, in the third essay of a series marking Nature’s anniversary on how the past 150 years have shaped science today.

Comment | | Nature

In 1995, astronomers detected a blisteringly hot Jupiter-mass planet orbiting closer to its host star than Mercury is to the Sun. This discovery recast our thinking of how planets form and led to a new era of exoplanetary exploration.

News & Views | | Nature

Shellen Wu traces the rise of the dominant force in science, in the second of a series of essays on the ways in which the past 150 years have shaped today’s research system, marking Nature’s anniversary.

Comment | | Nature

David Kaiser traces the roots of government support for science, in the first of a series of essays on how the past 150 years have shaped the research system, marking Nature’s 150th anniversary.

Comment | | Nature

A Review of advances in memory-editing techniques in humans suggests that these techniques are advancing beyond science fiction and could hold promise for translation into clinical practice.

Review Article | | Nature

This Perspective discusses the challenges associated with the prediction of chemical synthesis, in particular the reaction conditions required for organic transformations, and the role of machine-learning approaches in the prediction process.

Perspective | | Nature

Understanding the behaviour of the machines powered by artificial intelligence that increasingly mediate our social, cultural, economic and political interactions is essential to our ability to control the actions of these intelligent machines, reap their benefits and minimize their harms.

Review Article | | Nature

In the 150 years since the first issue was published, Nature has evolved alongside the research community it serves. We hope to continue to grow in the years to come.

Editorial | | Nature