Collection |

COVID-19 in gastroenterology & hepatology

In this Collection, we bring you articles published by Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology that cover the COVID-19 pandemic and its implications for the care of patients with gastrointestinal and liver diseases.

You can also read the latest news and opinion from Nature on the novel coronavirus and COVID-19 here, and research papers from across the Nature journals here.

Reviews & Perspectives

Although COVID-19 is a respiratory disease and its causative agent, SARS-CoV-2, principally infects the respiratory tract, extrapulmonary manifestations are observed. This Perspective explores the gastrointestinal symptoms associated with COVID-19 and the putative underlying mechanisms, discussing experimental evidence on SARS-COV-2 gastrointestinal infection and the potential for faecal–oral transmission.

Perspective | | Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in changes to the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, including major disruptions to endoscopy. This Perspective provides a guide and recommendations for inflammatory bowel disease endoscopy during a global health emergency based on expert experience in Italy and France.

Perspective | | Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Comments

Data on the efficacy and safety of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are now available, but evidence for these vaccines in those who are immunocompromised (including patients with inflammatory bowel diseases) are lacking. As vaccination begins, questions on advantages and disadvantages can be partially addressed using the experience from other vaccines or immune-mediated inflammatory disorders.

Comment | | Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Case reports and retrospective cohort studies have reported an association between acute pancreatitis and COVID-19. As SARS-CoV-2 (the causative agent of COVID-19) receptors are expressed in the pancreas and endothelial damage can occur, this association is plausible. However, this hypothesis has many biases and needs further investigation.

Comment | | Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology

The effect of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on liver transplantation programmes and recipients is still not completely understood but overall involves the risk of donor-derived transmission, the reliability of diagnostic tests, health-care resource utilization and the effect of immunosuppression. This Comment reviews the effect of COVID-19 on liver transplantation and summarizes recommendations for donor and recipient management.

Comment | | Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology

The gastrointestinal tract represents a target organ for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), warranting a thorough discussion on the consequences, particularly regarding inflammatory bowel diseases. Here, aspects of gastrointestinal involvement with SARS-CoV-2, the role of viruses as modulators of mucosal immunity and as treatment-related safety hazards, and the current clinical evidence will be discussed.

Comment | | Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) itself and/or the use of hepatotoxic drugs might negatively affect the course and management of patients with pre-existing chronic liver diseases. However, the greatest effect of COVID-19 on liver diseases will be indirect and delayed, resulting from the impending global economic crisis.

Comment | | Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 has undeniably affected modalities of medical and gastroenterology training in all endemic areas. Indeed, the adoption of various distance-learning techniques has been mandatory to facilitate education and enhance skills such as problem-solving, self-directed learning, open communication and also holistic non-cognitive attributes such as adaptability and collaboration.

Comment | | Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) practices have been disrupted. This Comment summarizes the key strategies that should be implemented for both patients and IBD specialists to provide optimal care while avoiding new outbreaks for the first 6–12 months after the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Comment | | Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is affecting and changing the daily practice of gastrointestinal endoscopy worldwide. To protect patients and endoscopy unit personnel, endoscopy units have had to postpone a large proportion of endoscopic procedures. These delays might have an effect on the screening for and surveillance of digestive cancers.

Comment | | Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) worldwide outbreak has led to a dramatic challenge for all healthcare systems, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) centres. Here, we describe the fast changes and clinical issues that IBD specialists could face during this SARS-CoV-2 infection pandemic, highlighting the potential rearrangements of care and resetting of clinical priorities.

Comment | | Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Editorials and Research Highlights