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Life in the lab

Scientists spend many hours in the laboratory. Here is a summary of Nature’s coverage of work and life in the scientific lab, with help and advice on how to succeed, when to take a break, and who to turn to when things get tough.

Help and advice

A brief return to the lab reminds John Tregoning of the limitations of remote meetings and how much he misses his research group, sharing data and chats about rubbish television.

Career Column | | Nature

Publishers, reviewers and other members of the scientific community must fight science’s preference for positive results — for the benefit of all, says Devang Mehta.

Career Column | | Nature

Is your lab full of sustainability champions or single-use scientists? Use our quiz to find out.

Career Column | | Nature

One institute has netted a cohort of researchers with a pre-designed project. A member of the hiring committee and a successful candidate explain how it works.

Career Q&A | | Nature

I gave up both football and the violin to focus exclusively on my graduate studies. But I came to realize just how important those hobbies were.

Career Column | | Nature

Eight months after moving to New York City to start a postdoctoral position at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Jessica Sharrock offers advice to others considering an academic move abroad.

Career Column | | Nature

Luck and happiness in the lab

A hobby or passion is an important tool that can help you in your research career, says Manasi Kulkarni-Khasnis.

Career Column | | Nature

Lab management

An opportunity to do a visiting fellowship in New Zealand meant Thomas Bennett had to manage his UK research group from afar — and so change his leadership approach.

Career Column | | Nature

The amount and quality of what you achieve are crucially dependent on how effectively you manage your time. Andrew C. Johnson and John Sumpter propose some simple steps that scientists can take to improve their time management.

Career Column | | Nature

Mental health

The medical programmes we see in our training as physician-scientists are becoming more progressive and supportive of students. Here’s what academia can learn from them, say Yoo Jung Kim and Erik Faber.

Career Column | | Nature