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Volume 10 Issue 5, November 2016

Volume 10 Issue 5

In this issue...

• Pharmaceutical M&As: Tracking the trends

• New crop of nucleic-acid-based drugs on the horizon

• Deals stack up around migraine’s new target

Cover image: DNA structure inspired by the nucleic-acid-based drugs feature. ktsimage, Thinkstock.

Trends in mergers and acquisitions

    Feature

  • News Feature |

    The number of mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical industry has continued to rise, with oncology being a particularly active area and assets increasingly being acquired at earlier stages of their development.

    • Laura J. Vitez
    • Richard K. Harrison
  • Profiles

  • Advertisement Feature |

    MeiraGTx is opening new frontiers in gene therapy by pioneering next-generation gene-regulation platforms to transform the application of gene therapy.

Nucleic-acid-based drugs

    Feature

  • News Feature |

    The potential of nucleic-acid-based drugs to halt the production of disease-associated proteins or to promote the production of therapeutic proteins has spurred a string of recent deals.

    • Biopharma Dealmakers
  • Profiles

  • Advertisement Feature |

    Over 80% of those who contract hepatitis B virus (HBV) recover from the disease, but some 350 million people worldwide are not able to control the virus and develop chronic infection that can seriously damage the liver — over 750,000 people die from complications every year.

  • Advertisement Feature |

    Since the days of Watson, Crick, and Franklin, DNA has hogged the limelight, overshadowing RNA. Recently, however, RNA has claimed center stage as a multi-talented player, dialing gene expression up or down and even altering the genome through gene editing

  • Advertisement Feature |

    The potential of gene silencing via RNAi has long been recognized, and innovations in the delivery of RNAi therapeutics by Dicerna Pharmaceuticals have enabled potent, long-acting gene silencing with a single subcutaneous injection for liver-associated diseases.

Deals stack up around migraine’s new target

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