Skip to main content

Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser (or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer). In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript.

Correction: Corrigendum: A new family of bizarre durophagous carnivorous marsupials from Miocene deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, northwestern Queensland

The Original Article was published on 27 May 2016

Scientific Reports 6: Article number: 26911; published online: 27 May 2016; updated: 07 September 2016

The original version of this Article contained the genus and species name of an unpublished taxon ‘Whollydooleya tomnpatrichorum’. In the Introduction section:

“Most recently, an isolated M2 or M3 has been ascribed to a new genus and species, Whollydooleya tomnpatrichorum from Whollydooley Site on Whollydooley Hill, west of the Riversleigh World Heritage Area20. While the deposit has not been dated, factors discussed in that paper suggest it could be late Miocene in age. Whollydooleya tomnpatrichorum shares a few apomorphic features with the molars of species of Sarcophilus but other very different features (e.g., hypertrophied entoconids) led Archer et al.20 to conclude that this Miocene hypercarnivore was probably part of a separate radiation not closely related to dasyurine dasyurids. The hypercarnivorous W. tomnpatrichorum may be related to species of Malleodectes, given some of the same Sarcophilus-like features seen in Ganbulanyi, but at present there is no convincing evidence that this is the case”.

Now reads:

“Most recently, an isolated M2 or M3 has been ascribed to a new genus and species, from Whollydooley Site on Whollydooley Hill, west of the Riversleigh World Heritage Area20. While the deposit has not been dated, factors discussed in that paper suggest it could be late Miocene in age. This taxon shares a few apomorphic features with the molars of species of Sarcophilus but other very different features (e.g., hypertrophied entoconids) led Archer et al.20 to conclude that this Miocene hypercarnivore was probably part of a separate radiation not closely related to dasyurine dasyurids. This hypercarnivorous taxon may be related to species of Malleodectes, given some of the same Sarcophilus-like features seen in Ganbulanyi, but at present there is no convincing evidence that this is the case.”

In the Discussion section:

“Second, Archer et al.20 described, on the basis of a damaged isolated lower molar, a new genus of dasyuromorphian as a Sarcophilus-size hypercarnivore (i.e., it was larger than G. djadjinguli and much larger than malleodectids) from the possibly late Miocene Wholly Dooley Site west of the Riversleigh World Heritage Area20. Its relationships to other dasyuromorphians, including other durophagous carnivores such as malleodectids, are unclear. Features that suggest it had a powerful bite include the short, wide, strongly-buttressed crown, hypertrophied protoconid, reduced metaconid and anteroposteriorly foreshortened talonid. Because lower molars for undoubted malleodectids have not been described, it is not yet possible to directly compare the features of the holotype of this new dasyuromorphian to malleodectids. Discovery of more complete lower and upper molars for W. tomnpatrichorum will be required to resolve the relationships of this taxon”.

Now reads:

“Second, Archer et al.20 described, on the basis of a damaged isolated lower molar, a new genus of dasyuromorphian as a Sarcophilus-size hypercarnivore (i.e., it was larger than G. djadjinguli and much larger than malleodectids) from the possibly late Miocene Wholly Dooley Site west of the Riversleigh World Heritage Area20. Its relationships to other dasyuromorphians, including other durophagous carnivores such as malleodectids, are unclear. Features that suggest it had a powerful bite include the short, wide, strongly-buttressed crown, hypertrophied protoconid, reduced metaconid and anteroposteriorly foreshortened talonid. Because lower molars for undoubted malleodectids have not been described, it is not yet possible to directly compare the features of the holotype of this new dasyuromorphian to malleodectids. Discovery of more complete lower and upper molars for the new hypercarnivore will be required to resolve the relationships of this taxon”.

These errors have now been fixed in the HTML and PDF versions of this Article.

Authors

Additional information

The online version of the original article can be found at 10.1038/srep26911

Rights and permissions

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Archer, M., Hand, S., Black, K. et al. Correction: Corrigendum: A new family of bizarre durophagous carnivorous marsupials from Miocene deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, northwestern Queensland. Sci Rep 6, 32054 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/srep32054

Download citation

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

Search

Quick links

Nature Briefing

Sign up for the Nature Briefing newsletter — what matters in science, free to your inbox daily.

Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing