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A randomised control trial evaluating non-technical skills acquisition using simulated situational training in oral surgery

BDJ volume 225, pages 629632 (12 October 2018) | Download Citation

Subjects

Key points

  • Suggests dental educators have an opportunity to diminish the risk of healthcare errors by using simulated training.

  • Suggests simulation training may improve a dental student's skills in communication, leadership, situational awareness and decision making.

  • Suggests non-technical skills are linked to a reduction in healthcare errors.

Abstract

Introduction

Seventy to eighty percent of healthcare errors are attributed to a breakdown in non-technical skills.

Objective

To determine the effect of simulation training on the acquisition of non-technical skills by undergraduate dental students.

Design

A parallel group, double blind, randomised controlled trial was designed. Simple randomisation, sequence generation and allocation concealment were undertaken.

Setting

University of Liverpool School of Dentistry, UK, 2017.

Materials and method

Eligible dental students had completed a minor oral surgery course, however, they had not completed a surgical extraction. The intervention group attended for a simulated, standardised minor oral surgery procedure. The control group attended for a video of such a procedure. Neither group received instruction in non-technical skills. Twenty-four hours following attendance, participants were observed completing a surgical extraction in a patient. Participants' non-technical skills were assessed by calibrated observers using a valid, reliable tool for their subjective assessment (NOTSS).

Results

There was a statistical difference between the groups in relation to mean NOTSS score (t = 2.2149, p <0.0439) demonstrating a significant effect of the intervention on the acquisition of non-technical skills.

Conclusion

Simulation training may support the acquisition of non-technical skills by dental students. Educators have an opportunity to diminish the risk of healthcare errors by incorporating simulation training.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. University of Liverpool, School of Dentistry, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, Merseyside L3 5PS

    • S. L. McKernon
    • , K. Fox
    •  & M. Balmer

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to S. L. McKernon.

About this article

Publication history

Accepted

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2018.808