Education | Published:

Blended learning and an exploration of student expectations on a Master's prosthodontics programme with reassessment at five years

BDJ volume 225, pages 441447 (14 September 2018) | Download Citation

Subjects

Key points

  • Suggests that blended learning effectively delivers postgraduate prosthodontic education.

  • Shows that satisfaction levels are high especially following graduation.

  • Highlights that students should be aware of the need for good time-management and self-motivation.

Abstract

Aims

To explore student expectations of a blended learning Master's programme in dentistry, evaluate whether the programme is meeting learner expectations and re-evaluate at a five year follow-up.

Materials and methods

A quantitative questionnaire was developed for an online survey of all new and current students as well as graduates from the past three years of the blended learning Master of clinical dentistry degree in fixed and removable prosthodontics at King's College London. A total of 124 surveys were emailed. Statistical analyses tested for differences between the groups and for differences within the groups. Five years later a re-evaluation was performed to assess changes.

Results

Initial response rates were: 69% for new students, 81% for current students and 66% for graduates. The majority of respondents expressed that the programme was meeting their expectations: 94% new students, 87% current students and 100% of graduates reported satisfaction. Over 90% of respondents agreed that they gained academic, clinical and career benefits through the programme. Most respondents agreed that blended learning enabled them to study effectively at a distance while maintaining other commitments. Difficulties identified were: time management, rigorous demands of the course, perceived feelings of isolation and insufficient feedback. Programme changes were implemented and the five year follow-up showed increased satisfaction levels at 92% and 96% for new and current students.

Conclusions

Interpretation of the data supports the application of blended learning and demonstrates that this blended Master's programme in prosthodontics provides a positive and meaningful learning experience for students. The learner view is essential for continued course evaluation and enhancement. Measures brought in to address recorded concerns have been effective. An evaluation of the challenges has led to improvements in the course content and delivery.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Clinical Senior Lecturer, King's College London

    • F. Hussain
  2. Professor, Vice Chancellor, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia

    • E. Leinonen
  3. Professor, Director of Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics Programme, King's College London

    • B. J. Millar

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to B. J. Millar.

Supplementary information

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    Supplementary Information

    Drafts of Survey Questionnaires

About this article

Publication history

Accepted

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2018.746