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Assessing the efficacy and cost of detergents used in a primary care automated washer disinfector

Key Points

  • Provides an evidence base for the cleaning efficacy for a washer disinfector used in general dental practice.

  • Provides an evidence base that cheaper detergents can be as effective as more expensive detergent options used in general dental practice.

  • Sets out estimated cost savings using cheaper detergents and shorter wash cycle times without compromising patient safety.

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Figure 1
Figure 2: Detection of amines on (A) the surface of small instruments and (B) the surface of large instruments that were soiled prior to washing with (blue box and whisker plots) the short cycle or (red box and whisker plots) the long cycle.

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Acknowledgements

This study was funded by a grant from the Chief Dental Officer for Scotland (University of Glasgow Grant No. 168,007–1). The washer disinfector was loaned by W&H UK Ltd. The corresponding suppliers donated the commercially available detergents.

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Correspondence to A. J. Smith.

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Winter, S., McDonagh, G., Lappin, D. et al. Assessing the efficacy and cost of detergents used in a primary care automated washer disinfector. Br Dent J 225, 315–319 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bdj.2018.643

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