Table 1 Western, Eastern and Nature’s Notebook phenophase definitions for the five phenological events or phenophases

From: Lilac and honeysuckle phenology data 1956–2014

  Western Network Eastern Network Nature’s Notebook
Reference 20 19 15
Dataset ID 8 7 Null (−9999), 3
Years 1956–2008 1961–2008 2009–2014
Leaf Phenophases for Lilac and Honeysuckle First leaf (76): Date when first bud has leafed. A bud is in leaf on the date when you first find that the widest part of a newly emerging leaf has grown beyond the ends of its opening winter bud scales. The leaf is distinguished by its prominent mid-ribs and veins. First leaf (76): Date when the widest part of the newly emerging leaf has grown beyond the ends of its opening winter bud scales. The leaf is distinguished by its prominent midrib and veins. From 2005 to 2008, the definition specifies this must be occurring in at least three places on the plant. Breaking leaf buds (373): In at least 3 locations on the plant, a breaking leaf bud is visible. A leaf bud is considered ‘breaking’ once the widest part of the newly emerging leaf has grown beyond the ends of its opening winter bud scales, but before it has fully emerged to expose the leaf stalk (petiole) or leaf base. The leaf is distinguished by its prominent midrib and veins. From 2009 to March 2011, ‘breaking leaf buds’ in this definition was referred to instead as ‘emerging leaves’.
Leaf Phenophases for Lilac and Honeysuckle Full leaf (75): Date when nearly all (at least 95%) of the actively growing buds have already leafed. Full leaf (75): Date when nearly all (at least 95%) of the actively growing leaf buds have already leafed. All leaf buds broken (374): For the whole plant, the widest part of a new leaf has emerged from virtually all (95–100%) of the actively growing leaf buds. From 2009 to March 2011, this phenophase was referred to as ‘All leaves emerged’.
Flower Phenophases for Lilac First bloom (412): Date of opening of first bloom is the date when the first flower is fully open. The lilac flower cluster is really a grouping of many small individual flowers, so the date to record is the date when one of the small flowers in a cluster is fully open. First bloom (77): Date when at least 50% of the flower clusters have at least one open flower. The lilac flower cluster is a grouping of many, small Individual flowers. Open flowers (205): For the whole plant, at least half (50%) of the flower clusters have at least one open fresh flower. The lilac flower cluster is a grouping of many, small individual flowers.
Flower Phenophases for Lilac Peak of full bloom (78): Date when nearly all of the flowers on the plant are open, but before any appreciable number of them have withered or dried up. Full bloom (78): Date when 95% of the flower clusters no longer have any unopened flowers, but before many of the flowers have withered. Full flowering (206): For the whole plant, virtually all (95–100%) of the flower clusters no longer have any unopened flowers, but many of the flowers are still fresh and have not withered.
Flower Phenophases for Lilac End bloom (79): Date when nearly all (at least 95%) of the flowers have withered or dried up is the date when the floral display has ended, except possibly for several clusters on the bush. End bloom (79): Date when at least 95% of the flowers have withered or dried up and the floral display has ended. End of flowering (207): For the whole plant, virtually all (95–100%) of the flowers have withered or dried up and the floral display has ended.
Flower Phenophases for Honeysuckle First bloom (428): Date of opening of first bloom is the date when the first flower is fully open. First bloom (428): Date when about 5% of the flowers are open. Open flowers (210): For the whole plant, at least 5% of the flowers are open and still fresh.
Flower Phenophases for Honeysuckle Peak of full bloom (78): Date when nearly all of the flowers on the plant are open, but before any appreciable number of them have withered or dried up. Full bloom (429): Date when 95% of the flowers are open, but before many have withered. Full flowering (211): For the whole plant, virtually all (95–100%) of the flowers have opened, and many of the flowers are still fresh and have not withered.
Flower Phenophases for Honeysuckle End bloom (416): Date when nearly all (at least 95%) of the flowers have withered or dried up is the date when the floral display has ended, except possibly for just a few branches. End bloom (79): Date when at least 95% of the flowers have withered or dried up and the floral display has ended. End of flowering (207): For the whole plant, virtually all (95–100%) of the flowers have withered or dried up and the floral display has ended.
  1. Rows contain equivalent phenophase definitions for each program. Phenophase identifiers (‘Phenophase_ID’ field in the data file) are in parentheses. Where definitions have slight variations in meaning they are given different identifiers, however, equivalent definitions are unified by the ‘Phenophase_Group’ field in the data file. Nature’s Notebook data submitted through the online interface has a null Dataset ID, while data submitted via mobile app has a Dataset ID of 3.