Table 1 Summary of the important clinical findings and investigations of all patients

From: Can vitamin B12 deficiency manifest with acute posterolateral or posterior cord syndrome?

Characteristics Patient 1 Patient 2 Patient 3 Patient 4 Patient 5
Age (years) 31 18 16 33 15
Sex Male Female Female Male Female
Total duration of illness (days) 10 15 7 10 6
Vegetarian Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
UL or LL complaints UL LL LL UL LL
Ankle reflex Normal Absent Absent Normal Absent
Plantar reflex Flexor Extensor Extensor Flexor Flexor
Romberg test Negative Positive Positive Negative Positive
Sensory gait ataxia No Yes Yes No Yes
Pseudoathetosis of hands Yes No No Yes No
Haemoglobin (12–15 g dl−1) 9.0 8.5 12.5 14.5 13.2
MCV (80–100 fL) 106 112 96 108 116
Macrocytes in peripheral smear Yes Yes Yes No Yes
Vitamin B12 level (243–894 pg ml−1) 97 86 102 92 88
Homocysteine (5–15 μmol l−1) 57 62 48 66 71
MRI spinal cord Cervical posterior cord hyperintensity Thoracic posterior cord hyperintensity Thoracic posterior cord hyperintensity Cervical posterior cord hyperintensity Normal
Clinical syndrome Acute posterior cord syndrome Acute posterolateral cord syndrome Acute posterolateral cord syndrome Acute posterior cord syndrome Acute posterior cord syndrome
Complete improvement 3 months 2 months 1 month 2 months 3 months
  1. Abbreviations: LL, lower limb; MCV, mean corpuscular volume; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; UL, upper limb.