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Eco-distress is not a pathology, but it still hurts

Climate change and ecological emergencies threaten life on Earth. This creates a distress that is in danger of being pathologized and dismissed. We examine how such feelings are rational and underpinned by instinctive compassion for the environment and each other. We must respond by supporting people to act with their full potential, amidst systemic and government failures.

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Correspondence to Elizabeth Marks.

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Marks, E., Hickman, C. Eco-distress is not a pathology, but it still hurts. Nat. Mental Health 1, 379–380 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1038/s44220-023-00075-3

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