Fig. 6 | Communications Biology

Fig. 6

From: Multi-omic analysis in transgenic mice implicates omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid imbalance as a risk factor for chronic disease

Fig. 6

A proposed mechanism (developed with integrated multi-omic analysis of transgenic animal models) showing the relationship between tissue omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid imbalance and the development of chronic disease. a To assemble the overall correlations among our data (n = 6/group), we performed correlation network analysis (Spearman’s non-parametric rank correlation coefficient). Each node was colored according to the data type and sized based on the betweenness centrality, which quantifies the influence of a node in connecting other nodes in a network. Edges (lines) represent statistically significant correlations, and are colored light black for positive and blue for negative correlations. Please refer panel b for abbreviations. b PCA (correlation type) analysis was performed on selected key parameters (n = 6/group), including the genotypes, gut microbiota, fecal and serum metabolites, and markers of metabolic disorders. c Diagram illustrating our proposed mechanism of tissue omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid imbalance leading to the development of chronic disease. Elevated tissue omega-6 PUFA status and an increased tissue n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio alters gut microbiota and gut microbial functional pathways, which in turn adversely influence fecal metabolites production and eventually microbiota-derived serum metabolites levels. These alterations plus adverse changes in the levels of serum non-microbiota-derived metabolites directly influenced by the elevated tissue n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio lead to increased intestinal permeability, development of metabolic endotoxemia and chronic low-grade inflammation, resulting in the occurrence of chronic disease (metabolic syndrome and cancer)

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