FUEL CELLS

Tunable catalysis via insulator–metal transition

Suppressing the degradation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells due to anode side-reactions during repetitive cell start-up/shut-down remains a formidable challenge. Now, a phase transition material of WO3 has been explored as a smart catalytic switch to enable highly selective electrocatalysis and improve fuel cell longevity.

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Fig. 1: Operational principle of WO3 as a metal–insulator transition switch in both HOR and ORR relevant conditions.

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Correspondence to Yifei Sun.

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Sun, Y., Ramanathan, S. Tunable catalysis via insulator–metal transition. Nat Catal 3, 609–610 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41929-020-0479-0

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