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Colloidal quantum dot electronics

Abstract

The development of electronics is increasingly dependent on low-cost, flexible, solution-processed semiconductors. Colloidal quantum dots are solution-processed semiconducting nanocrystals that have a size-tunable bandgap and can be fabricated on a range of substrates. Here we review developments in colloidal quantum dot electronics, focusing on luminescent, optoelectronic, memory and thermoelectric devices. We examine the role of surface chemistry in the suppression of non-radiative processes, the control of light–matter interactions and the regulation of carrier transport properties. We also highlight the prospects of perovskite quantum dots as single-photon sources, the design of new classes of colloidal quantum dots and superlattices for emerging applications and the role of hybrid device architectures in compensating for the limited carrier mobility in colloidal quantum dot solids while maintaining their tunable spectral response.

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Fig. 1: CQD-based electronics.
Fig. 2: Colloidal quantum dots.
Fig. 3: The design and engineering of luminescent devices.
Fig. 4: Broadly tunable absorption enables efficient optoelectronic devices.
Fig. 5: CQD-based memory devices.
Fig. 6: Design of CQD-based thermoelectric devices.

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Acknowledgements

This publication is based in part on support by the Ontario Research Fund Research Excellence Program, by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and by the Swiss National Science foundation via an Ambizione Fellowship (no. 161249). M.Y. acknowledges funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement no. 852751).

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Liu, M., Yazdani, N., Yarema, M. et al. Colloidal quantum dot electronics. Nat Electron 4, 548–558 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41928-021-00632-7

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