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ELECTRIC FIELD SENSING

Diamond defects detect what lies beneath

Nitrogen–vacancy defects in diamond can be used to visualize electric fields in an operating semiconductor device.

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Correspondence to Friedemann Reinhard.

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Fig. 1: Nitrogen–vacancy centres as electric field sensors in a diamond field-effect transistor.