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Zebrafish microbiome studies make waves

Abstract

Zebrafish have a 50-year history as a model organism for studying vertebrate developmental biology and more recently have emerged as a powerful model system for studying vertebrate microbiome assembly, dynamics and function. In this Review, we discuss the strengths of the zebrafish model for both observational and manipulative microbiome studies, and we highlight some of the important insights gleaned from zebrafish gut microbiome research.

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Fig. 1: Experimental paradigms for studying zebrafish microbiome assembly, dynamics and function.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health, under P01GM125576 to K.G., the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (1R01ES030226) to T.J.S. K.S. was supported in part by the NIEHS Integrated Regional Training Program in Environmental Health Sciences grant (PI R.L. Tanguay, T32-ES007060-38).

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Correspondence to Karen Guillemin.

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Stagaman, K., Sharpton, T.J. & Guillemin, K. Zebrafish microbiome studies make waves. Lab Anim 49, 201–207 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41684-020-0573-6

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