Review Article | Published:

Nonhuman primate species as models of human bacterial sepsis

Lab Animalvolume 48pages5765 (2019) | Download Citation

Abstract

Sepsis involves a disordered host response to systemic infection leading to high morbidity and mortality. Despite intense research, targeted sepsis therapies beyond antibiotics have remained elusive. The cornerstone of sepsis research is the development of animal models to mimic human bacterial infections and test novel pharmacologic targets. Nonhuman primates (NHPs) have served as an attractive, but expensive, animal to model human bacterial infections due to their nearly identical cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology, as well as host response to infection. Several NHP species have provided substantial insight into sepsis-mediated inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, acute lung injury, and multi-organ failure. The use of NHPs has usually focused on translating therapies from early preclinical models to human clinical trials. However, despite successful sepsis interventions in NHP models, there are still no FDA-approved sepsis therapies. This review highlights major NHP models of bacterial sepsis and their relevance to clinical medicine.

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank Dr. Claude A. Piantadosi for his critical review of this manuscript.

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  1. Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA

    • Lingye Chen
    • , Karen E. Welty-Wolf
    •  & Bryan D. Kraft

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https://doi.org/10.1038/s41684-018-0217-2