Figure 2 | Scientific Reports

Figure 2

From: Radon exposure is rising steadily within the modern North American residential environment, and is increasingly uniform across seasons

Figure 2

Radon test precision by duration and season of data capture. Panel A: Pie chart shows distribution of data reporting by city / region. 704 short term (5 day) alpha track radon tests were deployed <10 cm apart from (and in the latter 5 days of) a 90 + day winter alpha track test. Data points were plotted against each other (50% transparent black dots to show data density) with linear regression (red dotted line). Panel B: Standard deviations (SD) were calculated for concurrent 5 and/or 90 + day winter alpha track radon tests, using the data in Figs. 1E and 2A and as outlined in Supplementary Fig. 1. SD were extrapolated for radon doses up to 10,000 Bq/m3 for duplicate winter 90 + day tests, 5 versus 90 + day winter tests or 5 day summer tests versus 90 + day winter tests. Panel C: Upper graph indicates mean daily temperatures from March to August of 2018 for the survey region (Alberta), demarcating seasons. Lower graphs show the dataset from (A) subdivided by the specific date of the 5 day alpha track radon testing window, as indicated. Data points were plotted against each other (50% transparent black dots to show data density) with linear regression (red dotted line). Panel D: 100 × 5 day winter alpha track tests from (A) showing strong agreement with 90 + day winter tests were selected, and a second 5 day alpha track was deployed in the identical location in the same building during summer months, as indicated. Data points from 5 day winter or summer tests were plotted against the 90 + day winter test result (50% transparent blue (winter) or red (summer) dots to show data density) with linear regression (dotted lines). Panel E: The 5 day winter and summer radon data from (E) were plotted against one another as in (D).

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