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Figure 1

From: Radon exposure is rising steadily within the modern North American residential environment, and is increasingly uniform across seasons

Figure 1

Radon Potential and Domestic Exposure in North American Prairies. Panel A: Geological radon potential map of the North American prairies highlighting Alberta and Saskatchewan. Orange regions contain >300 Bq/kg radon-generating geologic material; yellow contains 100–300 Bq/kg and pale grey-yellow contains <100 Bq/kg. Panel B: Domestic indoor air radon concentrations from all buildings tested within the area highlighted in (A). Yellow dots = 0–99 Bq/m3; Orange dots = 100–199 Bq/m3; Red dots ≥ 200 Bq/m3. All dots are 50% transparent to indicate data densities. Panel C: Histogram of data distribution binned into increments as indicated. Panel D: Geometric mean radon of the Western Prairies from this study, relative to levels documented by previous national studies and summarized in9. Panel E: Concurrent duplicate 90 + day radon tests plotted against each other (50% transparent black dots) with linear regression (red dotted line). Left graph shows duplicates placed <10 cm apart, right graph shows duplicates in a different room of the same building. Panel F: Pie chart shows distribution of reporting. Graph shows geometric mean radon (grey bars) and arithmetic mean radon with 95% confidence intervals (black diamonds with bars) by floor of test placement. ANOVA analysis outcomes indicate significance.

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