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Figure 3

From: Happiness is Greater in More Scenic Locations

Figure 3

Happiness is Greater in More Scenic Settings. (a) We calculate the mean scenic rating of all Scenic-Or-Not photographs taken for each LSOA and depict these ratings using quantile breaks. Popular notions of scenic areas such as the Lake District and the Peak District are clearly visible on the map. (b) In order to understand whether scenic environments are simply green or natural environments, we consider data on the percentage of green land cover per LSOA36, depicted here using quantile breaks. (c) We also consider data on land cover types34, which we use to classify locations as natural environments or built-up environments. We find that scenic ratings are not equivalent to measurements of green space and are not entirely determined by whether an image was taken in a natural or built-up environment (see main text for analysis). (d) Coefficients of selected predictor variables and their 95% confidence intervals, based on results of a fixed effects model (for full results, see Table 1). The dependent variable is happiness, scaled to 0–100, and the coefficient size reflects the change in happiness rating associated with a change of one unit in the given predictor variable. We find that people are happier in more scenic environments, even when taking other traditional measurements of the environment into account. We observe that the predicted increase in happiness when moving from a location with the lowest possible scenic rating to a location with the highest possible scenic rating is similar in size to the increase in happiness predicted when participants are listening to music. (e) We find that this effect holds even within built-up areas, where policymakers have the ability to influence the aesthetics of the environments we live in. LCM2007 NERC (CEH) 2011. © Crown 2007, Ordnance Survey License number 100017572 third party licensors.

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