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Figure 5

From: Home Use of a Neural-connected Sensory Prosthesis Provides the Functional and Psychosocial Experience of Having a Hand Again

Figure 5

Impact of sensation on daily psychosocial measures. (A) Patient experience scale (short form) scores by study stage. Higher scale scores indicate better perceived outcomes in each domain (S1: n = 6, 7, 7 for stages 1, 2, 3, respectively; S2: n = 11, 13, 14 for stages 1, 2, 3, respectively). (B) Reported difficulty in task performance by study stage. Each day, participants rated their perceived difficulty in doing each of 28 tasks on a list based on the OPUS UEFS. Higher scores indicate greater perceived difficulty (S1: n = 6, 7, 7 for stages 1, 2, 3, respectively; S2: n = 11, 13, 14 for stages 1, 2, 3, respectively). (C) Perceived phantom limb length by study stage. The difference between the perceived phantom limb length and the contralateral limb length indicates the degree of limb telescoping experienced. Lower values of limb length difference correspond to a more natural phantom limb length and thus less disturbance in body image (S1: n = 6, 7, 8 for stages 1, 2, 3, respectively (n = 8 for stage 3 because we included one report from a day of interruption); S2: n = 11, 13, 15 for stages 1, 2, 3, respectively). Note that subject 1’s residual limb is ~20 cm shorter than his contralateral side, while subject 2’s residual limb is ~35 cm shorter than his contralateral side. All panels: Error bars indicate standard error of the mean. One-way ANOVAs with Tukey pairwise comparisons were used to compare outcomes across stages. Single asterisk indicate significance of p < 0.05. Double asterisks indicate significance of p ≤ 0.001.

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