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Structural and molecular mechanisms for membrane protein biogenesis by the Oxa1 superfamily

Abstract

Members of the Oxa1 superfamily perform membrane protein insertion in bacteria, the eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and endosymbiotic organelles. Here, we review recent structures of the three ER-resident insertases and discuss the extent to which structure and function are conserved with their bacterial counterpart YidC.

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Fig. 1: The Oxa1 superfamily.
Fig. 2: Members of the Oxa1 superfamily share a common membrane domain fold.
Fig. 3: Oxa1 homologs utilize cytoplasmically exposed coiled-coils for substrate recruitment.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by an EMBO Long Term Fellowship (ALTF 1230-2013) to M.A.M. and by the DFG through the Leibniz Programme (SI 586/6-1) and TRR83 (TP22) to I.S.

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M.A.M., M.H. and I.S. wrote the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Irmgard Sinning.

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Peer review information Nature Structural & Molecular Biology thanks the anonymous reviewers for their contribution to the peer review of this work. Anke Sparmann was the primary editor on this article and managed its editorial process and peer review in collaboration with the rest of the editorial team.

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McDowell, M.A., Heimes, M. & Sinning, I. Structural and molecular mechanisms for membrane protein biogenesis by the Oxa1 superfamily. Nat Struct Mol Biol 28, 234–239 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41594-021-00567-9

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