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SPATIAL CODING

Disordered grids in the third dimension

An Author Correction to this article was published on 14 October 2021

This article has been updated

Grid cells produce exceptionally regular firing patterns as animals navigate in 2D spaces. Two new studies show that in flying and climbing animals, the activity patterns of these cells in 3D space are irregular. These results reveal an unexpected way in which the brain represents spatial location.

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Fig. 1: Entorhinal activity is highly regular in 2D space, but irregular in 3D space.

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Correspondence to Dmitriy Aronov.

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Aronov, D. Disordered grids in the third dimension. Nat Neurosci 24, 1504–1505 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41593-021-00925-2

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