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Diversity and dynamism in the cerebellum

A Publisher Correction to this article was published on 04 January 2021

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Abstract

The past several years have brought revelations and paradigm shifts in research on the cerebellum. Historically viewed as a simple sensorimotor controller with homogeneous architecture, the cerebellum is increasingly implicated in cognitive functions. It possesses an impressive diversity of molecular, cellular and circuit mechanisms, embedded in a dynamic, recurrent circuit architecture. Recent insights about the diversity and dynamism of the cerebellum provide a roadmap for the next decade of cerebellar research, challenging some old concepts, reinvigorating others and defining major new research directions.

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Fig. 1: Intricacies of the cerebellar circuit.
Fig. 2: Revision of canonical ideas about inputs to the cerebellum via mossy fiber and climbing fiber pathways, based on recent discoveries.
Fig. 3: A potential solution for learned timing: a temporal basis set plus highly selective and specialized temporal contingencies for plasticity.
Fig. 4: Possible transfer of learning from early acquisition in the cerebellar cortex to consolidation in the cerebellar nucleus.

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C.I.D.Z., S.G.L. and J.L.R. contributed equally to the conceptualization and writing.

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Correspondence to Stephen G. Lisberger.

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De Zeeuw, C.I., Lisberger, S.G. & Raymond, J.L. Diversity and dynamism in the cerebellum. Nat Neurosci 24, 160–167 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41593-020-00754-9

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