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Biological imaging of chemical bonds by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

Abstract

All molecules consist of chemical bonds, and much can be learned from mapping the spatiotemporal dynamics of these bonds. Since its invention a decade ago, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has become a powerful modality for imaging chemical bonds with high sensitivity, resolution, speed and specificity. We introduce the fundamentals of SRS microscopy and review innovations in SRS microscopes and imaging probes. We highlight examples of exciting biological applications, and share our vision for potential future breakthroughs for this technology.

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Fig. 1: Principle of SRS microscopy.
Fig. 2: Instrumental advances.
Fig. 3: Imaging probe development.
Fig. 4: Application of SRS microscopy in cell biology, lipid biology and microbiology.
Fig. 5: Application of SRS microscopy in tumor biology, neurobiology, developmental biology, and pharmaceuticals.

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Acknowledgements

We thank L. Wei, L. Shi, H. Xiong and X. Liu for reading the manuscript. W.M. acknowledges support from National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director’s New Innovator Award, NIH R01 (EB020892 to W. M.), NIH R01 (GM128214 to W. M.), NIH R01 (GM132860 to W. M.), the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, and a Pilot and Feasibility grant from the New York Obesity Nutrition Research Center. F.H. acknowledges support from a Raymond and Beverly Sackler Center Postdoctoral Fellowship.

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Hu, F., Shi, L. & Min, W. Biological imaging of chemical bonds by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy. Nat Methods 16, 830–842 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41592-019-0538-0

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41592-019-0538-0

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