Infectious disease

Lessons about early neurodevelopment in children exposed to ZIKV in utero

Infants with congenital Zika virus infection are at risk for multiple abnormalities related to impairment in neurodevelopment. Although some findings apparent at birth may resolve with time, infants with no abnormalities apparent at birth may develop problems in early childhood.

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Fig. 1: Children with in utero Zika exposure may experience neurodevelopmental, eye, and hearing abnormalities that can revert.

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Correspondence to William J. Muller.

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