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HIV INFECTIONS

The hidden cost of genetic resistance to HIV-1

Assessment of more than 400,000 people over the age of 40 demonstrates that homozygosity for a CCR5 variant that prevents HIV-1 infection comes at the cost of increased rates of mortality.

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The author declares no competing interests.

Correspondence to Jeremy Luban.

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Fig. 1: There is an increased mortality rate among people homozygous for CCR5-Δ32.