Abstract

The clinical successes in immunotherapy have been both astounding and at the same time unsatisfactory. Countless patients with varied tumor types have seen pronounced clinical response with immunotherapeutic intervention; however, many more patients have experienced minimal or no clinical benefit when provided the same treatment. As technology has advanced, so has the understanding of the complexity and diversity of the immune context of the tumor microenvironment and its influence on response to therapy. It has been possible to identify different subclasses of immune environment that have an influence on tumor initiation and response and therapy; by parsing the unique classes and subclasses of tumor immune microenvironment (TIME) that exist within a patient’s tumor, the ability to predict and guide immunotherapeutic responsiveness will improve, and new therapeutic targets will be revealed.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

    • Mikhail Binnewies
    • , Edward W. Roberts
    • , Kelly Kersten
    •  & Matthew F. Krummel
  2. UCSF Immunoprofiler Initiative, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

    • Vincent Chan
    •  & Matthew F. Krummel
  3. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA

    • Douglas F. Fearon
  4. Precision Immunology Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA

    • Miriam Merad
  5. Department of Cell, Developmental & Cancer Biology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA

    • Lisa M. Coussens
  6. The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA, USA

    • Dmitry I. Gabrilovich
  7. Department of Biological Sciences, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD, USA

    • Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg
  8. Huntsman Cancer Institute and Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA

    • Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg
  9. Division of Inflammation Biology, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA, USA

    • Catherine C. Hedrick
  10. Department of Medicine, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA

    • Robert H. Vonderheide
  11. Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

    • Mikael J. Pittet
  12. Edwin L. Steele Laboratories for Tumor Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

    • Rakesh K. Jain
  13. Department of Surgery, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

    • Weiping Zou
  14. Division of Cancer Biology, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA

    • T. Kevin Howcroft
    •  & Elisa C. Woodhouse
  15. Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA, USA

    • Robert A. Weinberg

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The authors declare no competing interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Robert A. Weinberg or Matthew F. Krummel.