Review Article | Published:

RIP kinases as modulators of inflammation and immunity

Nature Immunologyvolume 19pages912922 (2018) | Download Citation

Abstract

Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases, in particular RIPK1, RIPK2 and RIPK3, have emerged as pleiotropic modulators of inflammatory responses that act either by directly regulating intracellular inflammatory signaling pathways or by causing apoptotic or necrotic cell death. In this Review, we discuss the signaling pathways and immunological functions of these RIP kinases in the inflammatory response to microbial infection and tissue injury, as well as their potential roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disease and aging.

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Acknowledgements

Supported by the National Basic Research (973) Program of China (2013CB910102), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31471303 and 31671436), a Project Funded by the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions and Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation for Young Teachers (151020) and the Non-profit Central Research Institute Fund of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (2017NL31002,2017NL31004).

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Affiliations

  1. Center of Systems Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medial College, Beijing; Suzhou Institute of Systems Medicine, Suzhou, Jiangsu, China

    • Sudan He
  2. Cyrus Tang Hematology Center and Collaborative Innovation Center of Hematology, State Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu, China

    • Sudan He
  3. Key Laboratory of Stem Cells and Biomedical Materials of Jiangsu Province and Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu, China

    • Sudan He
  4. National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing, Zhongguancun Life Science Park, Beijing, China

    • Xiaodong Wang
  5. Tsinghua Institute of Multidisciplinary Biomedical Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China

    • Xiaodong Wang

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The authors declare no competing interests.

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Correspondence to Sudan He or Xiaodong Wang.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/s41590-018-0188-x