Reply to ‘Mutations in RECQL are not associated with breast cancer risk in an Australian population’

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Author information

All authors are part of the team working on validating the role of RECQL in breast cancer, and they all contributed to writing this correspondence.

Correspondence to Mohammad R. Akbari.

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The authors declare no competing interests.

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