Fig. 1: Overview of the development of genome-edited lines for key SWEET genes and features of a diagnostic kit for combating bacterial blight rice. | Nature Biotechnology

Fig. 1: Overview of the development of genome-edited lines for key SWEET genes and features of a diagnostic kit for combating bacterial blight rice.

From: A SWEET solution to rice blight

Fig. 1

a, Development of genome-edited lines for three (SWEET 11, SWEET13 and SWEET14) genes in the genetic background of Kitaake, IR64 and Ciherang-Sub1. Edited EBEs for these genes were also stacked in the genetic background of Kitaake. Phenotyping of the lines showed full resistance to bacterial blight with the current set of Xoo strains. Therefore, after ensuring that they do not contain off-target mutations and confirming acceptable agronomic performance in mega environments, these lines can be deployed in rice-growing countries that allow genome-edited products. b, Components of a diagnostic kit for combating bacterial blight in rice. The kit includes SWEETup, a qRT-PCR primer set for detection of SWEET gene induction by Xoo strain; SWEETacc, GUS tester lines in the background of Kitaake for the detection of SWEET protein accumulation by Xoo strains; SWEETko, knockout tester lines in the background of Kitaake for the detection of specific SWEET gene dependences; SWEETpR, tester lines in the background of Kitaake to study whether EBE mutations cause Xoo resistance; and SWEETR, genome edited rice lines in the background of IR64 and Ciherang-Sub1 containing multiple SWEET promoter variants. The kit also contains SWEETpDB, a SWEET promoter database for the identification of TALE targets in different rice lines, and a web-based SWEET PathoTracer for geographical information system–based prediction of optimal resistance gene deployment. This kit can be used to analyze pathogen populations in the field in a given geographic region and then to identify suitable resistant lines from the kit. These lines can be used as resistant donors, and desirable resistant lines can be developed through molecular breeding approaches.

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