Extended Data Fig. 11: Patterns of structural variants causing fusion genes and enhancer hijacking. | Nature

Extended Data Fig. 11: Patterns of structural variants causing fusion genes and enhancer hijacking.

From: Patterns of somatic structural variation in human cancer genomes

Extended Data Fig. 11

a, Rainfall plot of structural-variant breakpoints in the genes KIAA1549 and BRAF, commonly fused together through a tandem duplication in pilocytic astrocytomas. Structural variants are coloured by classification and arranged vertically by the distance to the next breakpoint in the cohort. If the two sides of a breakpoint junction are contained within the plotting window, they are joined by a curved line. The number of samples with a breakpoint in the plotting window is annotated in the table at the top of each panel. b, Rainfall plot of structural-variant breakpoints that affect RET, commonly fused to CCDC6 by inversion in papillary thyroid cancer. c, Rainfall plot of structural-variant breakpoints that affect BCL2, commonly hijacked to the IGH immunoglobulin locus by translocations in B cell lymphomas. d, Rainfall plot of structural-variant breakpoints that affect ERG, commonly fused with TMPRSS2 by deletion or more-complex events in prostate adenocarcinoma. e, Example of a TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene in a prostate adenocarcinoma created by a chromoplexy cycle. The estimated copy-number profile is shown as black horizontal segments, with structural variants shown as dotted arcs linking the edges of two copy-number segments. f, Example of a TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene in a prostate adenocarcinoma created by chromothripsis.

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