Extended Data Fig. 2: SSEs duration estimations for the example of SSE 34. | Nature

Extended Data Fig. 2: SSEs duration estimations for the example of SSE 34.

From: Similar scaling laws for earthquakes and Cascadia slow-slip events

Extended Data Fig. 2

a, The blue lines represent the moment rate evolution of each sub-fault participating in the SSE 34. The sub-faults moment rate is estimated using a zero-phase digital filtering on the rough \({\delta }_{{\rm{deficit}}}\) using a 5-day window (effectively 9 days). The yellow line shows the number of tremors per day within the SSE rupture area. The solid red lines indicate the start and end times picked manually to estimate the minimum duration. They are determined by the timing of the first and last sub-faults with \({\dot{M}}_{{\rm{0deficit}}} < {\dot{M}}_{{\rm{0thresh}}}\) (the threshold rate is represented by the horizontal black dashed line). The dashed red lines similarly indicate the start and end times of the SSEs picked to estimate the maximum duration. They are determined by the times of the first and last sub-faults when \({\dot{M}}_{{\rm{0deficit}}} < 0\). The dotted green lines indicate the automatic time picks for the start and end of the SSEs15. b, The black dots show the cumulative moment release in excess of the moment release that would have accumulated at the interseismic rate (as the SSE are extracted from the time series corrected for long-term interseismic strain). The blue line is its smoothed version using the same filter as indicated in a. The red and green vertical lines and the yellow curve are the same as in a. To illustrate the methodology used to calculate the SSE moment release, M0, we indicate the values taken for the calculation based on the minimum duration by two horizontal solid black lines. c, The blue line indicates the SSE moment rate (sum of the moment rates of the SSE sub-faults). The horizontal black dashed line represents the sum of \({\dot{M}}_{{\rm{0thresh}}}\) of all of the sub-faults. The red, yellow and green lines are the same as in a.

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