Extended Data Fig. 3: The gut-to-brain osmosensory signal completely satiates, but only mildly stimulates, thirst. | Nature

Extended Data Fig. 3: The gut-to-brain osmosensory signal completely satiates, but only mildly stimulates, thirst.

From: A gut-to-brain signal of fluid osmolarity controls thirst satiation

Extended Data Fig. 3

a, b, Additional data related to Figs. 1e–g and 2a, b. a, Left, average SFO activity during intragastric infusions and subsequent drinking while hydrated. Right, cumulative water intake (n = 4 mice). b, Left, average SFO activity during intragastric infusions and subsequent drinking after dehydration. Right, cumulative water intake (n = 4 mice). c, Correlation between SFO activity change and latency to drinking after 1-ml infusions into hydrated (black; n = 23 experiments from 4 mice, linear regression, R2 = 0.0705, P = 0.2208) or dehydrated (red; n = 12 experiments from 4 mice, linear regression, R2 = 0.1321, P = 0.2456) mice. d, Additional data related to Fig. 2c. Average SFO activity after systemic (intraperitoneal) or intragastric treatment with 150 μl NaCl while hydrated. Shaded areas in a, b, d represent mean ± s.e.m., and in c represent 95% confidence interval for the line of best fit.

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